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Thread: English/Polish

  1. #1
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    Default English/Polish

    Good morning dear teachers,
    Could you check my writing and give me some comments?
    In England that he abandoned, George Bidwell isn’t known, in Poland he chose – he isn’t remembered.
    In 1949 he decided that the rest of his life would be devoted to a new homeland. He left England, where he had been a journalist and a bank clerk, for Poland, where without even knowing the language, he became a writer and published over 60 novels and historical books. Many of them are still available on the Internet. Even so, the recent edition of “The Lexicon of Polish writers”, released by the Cracovian Scientific Publishing House doesn’t mention him at all. Apparently, the Poles perceive him to have been an English writer. But what we really know about George Bidwell?
    At the end of the year 1945 major Bidwell appeared in the London Office of the British Council. He had been called by colonel Kenneth Johnston, the head of the European institute department engaged in the promotion of British culture abroad. Bidwell, the ex-chief of the British Army supply in the Near East and participant in the battle of El Almein, had worked for the British Council for two years. “It seems that during your service in the Near East you were in touch with some Polish people?”, asked Johnston. Bidwell confirmed. “Then I have something to offer you. We lack a manager in Poland, would you agree to become one?”
    Thanks in advance:)

  2. #2
    Monticello's Avatar
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    Default Re: English/Polish

    Hi cat's_eyes,

    Corrections and comments follow:

    In the England that he abandoned, George Bidwell isn’t known; in the Poland that he chose, he isn’t remembered. (These corrections support the parallel structure of your first sentence -- a very effective opening! Please note that for this purpose, the semicolon now replaces your former comma, and that your dash in the second clause has been replaced by a comma.) In 1949, he Bidwell decided that the rest of his life would be devoted to a new homeland. He left England, where he had been a journalist and a bank clerk, for Poland, where, without even knowing any prior knowledge of the language, he later became a naturalized Polish writer, and published eventually having published over 60 novels and historical books in his adopted language. (Did Bidwell do the actual publishing? - Probably not; thus the suggested revision " ... having published ..." here. Also, "... in his adopted language" is added here simply to emphasize Bidwell's accomplishment as a naturalized Polish writer.) Many of them these works are still available on the Internet.

    Even so, the most recent edition of “The Lexicon of Polish Writers” (Please provide the year of publication here within parentheses.), released by the Cracovian Scientific Publishing House, doesn’t mention him at all. Apparently, the Poles perceive consider him to have been primarily an English writer. But what do we really know about George Bidwell?

    At the end of the year 1945, Major Bidwell appeared in the London Office of the British Council. He had been called by Colonel Kenneth Johnston, the head of the European Institute department engaged in the promotion of British culture abroad. Bidwell, the ex-chief of the British Army supply in the Near East and participant in the Battle of El Almein, had worked for the British Council for two years.

    (Set your dialogue -- a very effective technique to advance your essay/narrative -- off in a separate paragraph.)
    “It seems that during your service in the Near East you were in touch with some Polish people?” (Comma deleted here.) asked Johnston. Bidwell confirmed. “Then I have something to offer you. We lack a manager in Poland, would you agree to become one?” (Period deleted here.)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: English/Polish

    Thank you very much, great comments, now I really like the text. I hope one day I will use such vocabulary to express my thoughts. I love it, thank you once again

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    Default Re: English/Polish

    But one thing: 'in the England is correct'? They have always taught me that no 'the' should be there... Please, give more explanation:)

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    Default Re: English/Polish

    Quote Originally Posted by cat's_eyes View Post
    But one thing: 'in the England is correct'? They have always taught me that no 'the' should be there... Please, give more explanation:)
    Hello again cat's_eyes,

    Yes. You have been taught correctly. Generally speaking, one would not use the article "the" to precede a country. But here it is called for.

    Why? - because here you are referring to Bidwell's particular England and Poland. In other words, the use of the article here not only highlights those singular circumstances that surrounded Bidwell's decision to uproot from England to Poland, but also how he is viewed today.

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    Default Re: English/Polish

    Oh, now I understand, thanks a lot:)

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