Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 56
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Smile How do you say in English to buy movie tickets in a movie theater?

    Hi! All teachers.

    I'd like to make a dialogue based on the conversation in a box office at a movie theater for my students so can you all help me this dialogue more authentic. I'm desperate....If you know the useful site reffering to the conversation between the clerk and the customer in a box office.

    If you find some awkward exprssion, don't hesitate to tell me, please. I need your honest opinion and common useful expression in the sitatuin.

    (I just put some expressions that I'm not sure for the context in the
    parethesis belows,)

    Clerk: Hi. How can I help you?
    Me: Oh, hi. I'd like to buy two students tickets for the Harry Potter
    and the half blood prince.
    Clerk: O.K. What time do you want to see?
    Me: 8:30
    Clerk: Sorry, they(all tickets) are sold out. (We don't have seats
    avaliable)
    Me: What about the other time?
    Clerk: Let me ckeck. Um...We have four seats available at 5:30 and 7:00.
    Me: Then, can I have two tickets at 7:00?
    Clerk: Sure. No problem. Are you a student or an adult?
    Me: a Student. (student)
    Clekr: Do you have a student I.D. with you? (Please give me your student
    card.)
    Me: O.K. Sure. Here it is. .
    Clerk: That would be $15 doallrs.

    I've got some questions about movie vocabulary.

    First, how do you say the person selling a movie ticket in the box office? Is he or she a box office clerk? or a ticket clerk?

    Second, Which one is commonly used when you buy a movie ticket?
    I'd like two tickets for Harry Potter at 7: 30.
    Can I have two tikcets for Harry Potter at 7: 30?

    Third, what is the difference between "cinema" and "movie theater"?
    As far as I'm concerened, cinema is british. If so, Americans do not use cinema instead of movie theater in daily conversation?

    These expressions mean the same thing,
    A) What’s on at the movies?
    b) What’s on at the cinema?
    Then, does the choice of both words lie in the personal preference?

    Thanks a million in advance. (I'm so sorry to post many questions, next time I won't do that.)

  1. Monticello's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 455
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: How do you say in English to buy movie tickets in a movie theater?

    Hi Eureka,

    Please bear in mind that, being American, my suggestions here reflect the dialogue one is likely to encounter in the US. This may differ from common British dialogue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eureka
    I'd like to make a dialogue based on the conversation in a box office at a movie theater for my students so can you all help me this dialogue more authentic. I'm desperate....If you know the useful site reffering to the conversation between the clerk and the customer in a box office.
    Sorry, Eureka, I'm not aware of any web sites related to your questions. Have you tried any Google searches?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eureka
    If you find some awkward exprssion expressions, don't hesitate to tell me, please. I need your honest opinion and about common useful expression in for the sitatuin (given) situation.

    (I just put some expressions that I'm not sure for the context in the parenthesis belows,) Better: (Below, I've enclosed within parentheses those expressions I'm not sure about.)
    OK. I'll edit your dialogue below with corrections and suggestions.

    Clerk: Hi. How can I help you?
    Me: Oh, hi. I'd like to buy two students tickets for the Harry Potter
    and the half blood prince Half Blood Prince. (Though there will be no audible difference in a reading of the script here, your script should recognize the standard for writing titles.)
    Clerk: O.K. What time do you want to see? For what showing? or ... show? or ... time?
    Me: 8:30, please.
    Clerk: Sorry, they(all tickets) that show is are sold out. (We don't have (any) seats
    avaliable for that show(ing).)
    Me: What about the other times? or ... other show(ing)s? or Are there any tickets available for other show(ing)s? or ... other times?
    Clerk: Let me ckeck. Um...We (do) have four seats available at (either) 5:30 and (or) 7:00. (If you use "either" couple it with "or," otherwise, "and.")
    Me: Then, can may I have two tickets at 7:00? (Please Note: Though " ... can I have ... " is often heard, it is not "correct." " ... may I have ..." is. If you choose to use the "incorrect" "... can I have ..." in your script, you will be creating a subtle characterization through this colloquialism.)
    Clerk: Sure. No problem. Are you a Students or an adults? (Please Note: I reside in a huge college student market -- Boston. It's not common for cinemas in the US to offer a student rate. The price difference, if it is given at all, will usually be for children (usually designated as under 13) and adults. In some special (rare) cases in the US, however, cinemas may accept a student coupon or ID for a discount.)
    Me: a Students. (student)
    Clekr: Do you have a student I.D. with you? (Please give me your student
    card.) or "May I see your student ID(s)?"
    Me: O.K. Sure. Here it is. . or ( ... they are.)
    Clerk: That would That'll be $15, please. or doallrs written out in words: ... fifteen dollars, please.

    I've got some questions about movie vocabulary.

    First, how do you say What is the job title of the person selling a movie tickets in at the box office? Is he or she a box office clerk? or a ticket clerk? Either one is commonly used in the US. Also "ticket seller."

    Second, Which one is commonly used when you buy a movie ticket?
    I'd like two tickets for Harry Potter at 7: 30, please. Yes.
    Can May I have two tikcets tickets for Harry Potter at 7: 30, please? (One will also often hear/use: "Two for Harry Potter at 7:30, please." Also Note as above: Though "Can I have ... " is often heard, it is not "correct." "May I have ..." is. If you choose to use the "incorrect" "Can I have ..." in your script, you will be creating a subtle characterization through this colloquialism.)

    Third, what is the difference between "cinema" and "movie theater"?
    As far as I'm concerened, cinema is British. If so, do Americans do not use cinema instead of movie theater in daily conversation? Yes. Both are common in the US.

    These expressions mean the same thing,
    A) What’s on playing at the movies?
    b) What’s on playing at the cinema?
    c) What's playing at ___________? Fill in the blank with a specific cinema/movie complex.
    Then, does the choice of both words lie in the personal preference? Yes. Both are common, though one is more apt to hear "movies" in the US.

    Thanks a million in advance. (I'm so sorry to post many questions, next time I won't do that.)

    My pleasure, Eureka.
    Last edited by Monticello; 25-Apr-2009 at 02:30.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 56
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: How do you say in English to buy movie tickets in a movie theater?

    Thank you, Monticello. I can't thank you enough. I'm so impressed with your great answer. I think most of your students are very lucky. Have a great day. I want to say "thank you" million times.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] don't sign nothing
    By Unregistered in forum Frequently Asked Questions
    Replies: 84
    Last Post: 04-Jun-2010, 02:25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •