Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    daemon99 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    262
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Usage of side... vehicles coming on your right side

    Can someone please correct the paragraph below?

    When you are walking with your little daughter on a busy road, let her walk on the safer side of the road. Say, the vehicles are coming on your right side, hold her hand with your right hand.

  2. #2
    pyoung is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Usage of side... vehicles coming on your right side

    Quote Originally Posted by daemon99 View Post
    Can someone please correct the paragraph below?

    When you are walking with your little daughter on a busy road, let her walk on the safer side of the road. Say, the vehicles are coming on your right side, hold her hand with your right hand.
    Dear daemon:

    When you are walking with your little daughter on a busy road, let her walk as far away from the traffic as possible. Say, the vehicles are coming on your right side, have her walk to your left.

    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra

  3. #3
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Usage of side... vehicles coming on your right side

    Our Highway Code has the advice that if you are on a pavement, you are safer facing oncoming traffic than walking with your back towards it. Therefore pedestrians are advised to walk on the left of the pavement [sidewalk].

  4. #4
    daemon99 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    262
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Usage of side... vehicles coming on your right side

    Thanks a lot, pyoung and Anglika!

    One of the most difficult things for me to understand is the usage of front, side, back and behind.

    For example, I don't understand which is correct walk on your right or walk to your right.

    You should have her walk to your right.
    You should have her walk on your right.


    Can you please tell me the difference between the above two sentences?

    Say, the vehicles are coming on your right side...

    Can I replace the above sentence with...

    Say, the vehicles are coming on your right...

    I also get confused with the following sentences. I can't make out the difference.

    It lies to the north of Africa.
    It lies on the north of Africa.


    She sat on my right.
    She sat to my right.

  5. #5
    pyoung is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Usage of side... vehicles coming on your right side

    Quote Originally Posted by daemon99 View Post
    Thanks a lot, pyoung and Anglika!

    One of the most difficult things for me to understand is the usage of front, side, back and behind.

    Prepositions! the cause of much suffering!

    For example, I don't understand which is correct walk on your right or walk to your right.

    You should have her walk to your right.
    You should have her walk on your right.



    Can you please tell me the difference between the above two sentences?

    Both mean the same thing. 'On your right' is short for 'on your right side.'
    In a way, 'to your right' is clearer, because 'on' can mean 'on top of,' and can therefore cause confusion. Native speakers will immediately understand either phrase, though.

    Say, the vehicles are coming on your right side...

    Can I replace the above sentence with...

    Say, the vehicles are coming on your right...to your right would sound clearer to me.

    I also get confused with the following sentences. I can't make out the difference.

    It lies to the north of Africa. It is north of and not contiguous with Africa.
    It lies on the north of Africa. Usually the sentence would say something like, 'It lies on the northern coast of Africa.

    She lives to the north of us.
    She lives on the north side of town.

    She sat on my right.
    She sat to my right.

    They mean the same thing. I like 'to my right' because it describes the direction more clearly ('To' is more clearly a direction word. 'On' has more uses.

    Also, people often use the phrase 'right-/left-hand side. 'It's on the left-hand side of the road.' 'He's the one in the upper right-hand corner of the photo.'
    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Usage of front and side
    By daemon99 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Apr-2009, 19:35
  2. Re: Usage of certain very common words
    By Dinesh Boudh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2007, 21:23
  3. "a side of" equals "a side to"?
    By Joe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Feb-2004, 16:42
  4. Subject of a verb
    By Anonymous in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14-Oct-2003, 07:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk