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Thread: want

  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Default want

    I wonder if there is any difference between (1) and (2).

    (1), I don't want you to get sick.
    (2), I don't want you getting sick.

    Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: want

    Both are fine and mean much the same. The first fits coventional grammar patterns.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: want

    Whereas the first sentence seems to be of a more "preventative" point of view, it would seem that the second indicates that the process of "getting sick" has already begun and therefore they don't want you somewhere.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: want

    The second might be used to sound more reassuring and caring, mightn't it?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: want

    Hey, tdol! Absolutely! I guess I hadn't thought of it that way, I was more focused on finding a difference! Anyway, loved the "mightn't"...

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