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Thread: jive talking

  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    jive talking

    hello,

    what does it mean, please?

    thanks.

  2. #2
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: jive talking

    Hi jctgf,

    If “it” in your question is for the phrase "jive talking'", it is slang for "telling lies", which was a popular colloquialism at the time

    jive (n) = deceptive, nonsensical, or glib talk

    jive (v) = to talk nonsense; kid

    Regards,

    V.

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    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Re: jive talking

    hi,
    is there a modern expression or slang for this, please?
    thanks.

  4. #4
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: jive talking

    I'm not a teacher

    Hi jctgf,

    You have to think by a stretch of your imagination.

    Here is a link where you might find the most modern "expressions and slang" concerning the phrase in question:

    jive: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com

    jive (n) = leg-pull
    jive (v) = make a fool of someone, pull the wool over someone’s eyes, pull someone’s leg

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 02-May-2009 at 18:50.

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    Re: jive talking

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    hello,

    what does it mean, please?

    thanks.
    Hi jctgf,

    The word, jive, like the word, jazz, probably has its origins in African-American heritage. To "talk jive" is an American slang expression, very prevalent in the 1970's and now somewhat dated, that means to speak with African-American slang.

    But "jive talk" certainly predates the '70's. The 1940's had its own flavor. Malcolm X , recalling his younger days in the 1930's & '40's, uses it heavily in his Autobiography (posthumously published, 1965; written with Alex Haley). And it definitely finds its way into the poetry of Langston Hughes.

    For further background, take a look through some of these links about "jive talk". And when you do, be sure not to miss this hilarious sequence from the movie Airplane! (1980): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-xHPU6NulM
    Last edited by Monticello; 02-May-2009 at 19:57.

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    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Re: jive talking

    hi,

    let me tell you guys what I'm looking for so that, maybe, you can help me.

    please suppose that a manager is asking his subordinate why something isn't done yet (a task that should already be completed, for example).

    the girl keeps giving excuses.

    she's not very clear and tries not to blame herself.

    she keeps saying that the goal will be achieved "as soon as possible" but isn't very clear as to the date it will happen.

    every time, after the manager talks to her, the manager feels like the subordinate isn't very honest, is trying to gain some time and perhaps is somehow fooling him.


    I'd like to know what's the colloquial name for this kind of "talk" the subordinate has.

    "little talk" for example, is used for conversations where people don't talk about anything important, right?

    so, is there a name for a talk in which someone seems to be trying to gain some time and keeps giving excuses because a goal hasn't been achieved yet?

    thanks.

  7. #7
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: jive talking

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi jctgf,

    In my native language I would use the connotation “pull the wool over someone’s eyes” or “bamboozle” for the adduced case.

    jive (v) = to cajole or mislead

    jive (adj) = misleading; phony

    phony (adj) = not honest or truthful; deceptive: a phony excuse

    Regards,

    V.

  8. #8
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    Re: jive talking

    Hi jctgf et al.,

    vil's definition of the word, jive, given in the preceding post is not incorrect. But one should recognize that the word has a larger range of meanings depending upon the context and how it is used.

    In this regard, the phrase "jive talking" -- the premise of this thread -- concerns all (and then some) that I have posted about its African American slang heritage. This broad context is much different from the more limiting context of the use of the word in the following sentence: "He's jiving you." Here,in this context, the word carries its slang meaning of "to cajole or mislead," or as vil further elucidates, to " “pull the wool over someone’s eyes” or “bamboozle” ."

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf
    so, is there a name for a talk in which someone seems to be trying to gain some time and keeps giving excuses because a goal hasn't been achieved yet?
    Yes. In the US, the phrase most often heard in the kind of situation you describe here is "con man," which is short for the slang phrase "confidence man," i.e., someone who gains another's confidence for fraudulent purposes. From this slang phrase, comes the verb: to con, and its forms: conned,conning, etc. Thus, the sentences: "He conning you." or "You were conned!"

    By the way, to pass the time, people in the US don't make "little talk," but "small talk".

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