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  1. #1
    shinji002 is offline Junior Member
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    Question furious at or furious with.

    Dear Mr Answer:

    look at these two:

    1.I was late and he was furious with me.
    2.He's furious about/at the way he's been treated.

    could i say :

    1.I was late and he was furious at me.
    2.He's furious with the way he's been treated. ?

    Please tell me the differences between furious at and furious with, are they the same in all situations?

    thx

  2. #2
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: furious at or furious with.

    1. I was late and he was furious at me. [Correct]
    2. He's furious with the way he's been treated. [Wrong]

    furious with someone [Correct]
    furious at someone [Correct]
    furious with something [Wrong]
    furious at something [Correct]

    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press
    <furious>
    extremely angry:
    - I was late and he was furious with me.
    - He's furious about/at the way he's been treated.
    - We had a furious row last night.

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    <furious>
    very angry
    - She's furious at/over how slowly the investigation is proceeding.
    - I was furious with/at them for printing the story.
    - a furious argument

  3. #3
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    Default Re: furious at or furious with.

    You're angry/furious with people.

    You're angry/furious at/about events, or the actions of others.

    He's furious about/at the way he's been treated.
    He's angry at/about being dropped from the football team.
    and
    He's furious with the coach for dropping him from the team.

  4. #4
    shinji002 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: furious at or furious with.

    thank you all, i think i got it~

  5. #5
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: furious at or furious with.

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    You're angry/furious with people.

    You're angry/furious at/about events, or the actions of others.

    He's furious about/at the way he's been treated.
    He's angry at/about being dropped from the football team.
    and
    He's furious with the coach for dropping him from the team.
    He's furious with the coach at dropping him from the team.
    He's furious with the coach about dropping him from the team.
    He's furious with the coach over dropping him from the team.

    These are all ungrammatical, aren't they?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: furious at or furious with.

    "Angry with the coach for dropping me..." : a specific instance of a specific action that made him angry


    compare, a general situation:
    "She was angry with her husband about the limited amount of time he spends with the family at weekends."
    Here, the anger is 'about' the limited time spent with the family, and angry that this means the kids are not getting the time they need with him, and how the wife feels, being neglected. The significance of 'limited time' is much broader than hours measured by the clock.

    So
    He's furious with the coach at dropping him from the team.
    He's furious with the coach about dropping him from the team.

    are not correct.

    You will hear
    He's furious with the coach over dropping him from the team.
    Perhaps because we say, "They are fighting about.../they are fighting over..." that some people say 'angry with him over...'
    If I have to suggest what's 'right and wrong', then avoid it: use 'about'
    Last edited by David L.; 11-May-2009 at 00:06.

  7. #7
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    Snowcake is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: furious at or furious with.

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    He's furious with the coach about dropping him from the team.
    are not correct.

    You will hear
    He's furious with the coach over dropping him from the team.
    Perhaps because we say, "They are fighting about.../they are fighting over..." that some people say 'angry with him over...'
    If I have to suggest what's 'right and wrong', then avoid it: use 'about'
    David, this part of your comment was a bit confusing to me. Is 'about' correct or wrong?

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    Default Re: furious at or furious with.

    Good for you, Snowcake.
    I was so caught up with 'fight about' and 'fight over' ...and not using 'angry over'...

    So - don't write 'angry...over...' or furious...over'. Use 'about' or 'for', and which of these applies was the first part of my post:

    "Angry with the coach for dropping me from the team" : a specific instance of a specific action that made him angry

    compare, a general situation:
    "She was angry with her husband about the limited amount of time he spends with the family at weekends."
    Here, the anger is 'about' the limited time spent with the family, and angry that this means the kids are not getting the time they need with him, and how the wife feels, being neglected. The significance of 'limited time' is much broader than hours measured by the clock.
    Last edited by David L.; 11-May-2009 at 00:04.

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