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    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default slept in/ threw a fit/hard-and-fast

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    “I slept in and had to pack my bag in a panic. “

    sleep in = oversleep, sleep late

    “If a child threw a fit in a shopping mall, it would be correct to say, “She behaved badly.””

    throw a fit = have a fit = become extremely upset.; make a scene (make a row)

    Fit and fits, along with conniption fit, have been used in hyperbolic expressions to denote a bout of hysterics.

    “This is not a hard-and-fast rule, however; such mass nouns as furniture and cutlery, which represent more easily quantified objects, show that the mass/count distinction should be thought of as a property of the terms themselves, rather than as a property of their referents.”

    hard-and-fast rule= very strict used rule

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: slept in/ threw a fit/hard-and-fast

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    dear teachers,

    would you be kind enough to tell me whether i am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    “i slept in and had to pack my bag in a panic. “

    sleep in = oversleep, sleep late yes

    “if a child threw a fit in a shopping mall, it would be correct to say, “she behaved badly.””

    throw a fit = have a fit = become extremely upset.; make a scene (make a row) yes. Also "chuck a wobbly". in a child it is usually called a "temper tantrum"

    fit and fits, along with conniption fit, have been used in hyperbolic expressions to denote a bout of hysterics. yes, but "to have a fit" often means to have an epileptic fit, not a fit of anger, etc. "throw a fit" is better for the emotional context.

    “this is not a hard-and-fast rule, however; such mass nouns as furniture and cutlery, which represent more easily quantified objects, show that the mass/count distinction should be thought of as a property of the terms themselves, rather than as a property of their referents.”

    hard-and-fast rule= very strict used rule. yes, otherwise called a rule that is "set in concrete."

    thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    v.
    r

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