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  1. #1
    RJ021 Guest

    Default "If" vs "in case (of)"

    There is any difference when to use "if" and "in case (of)"?

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    Exclamation Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by RJ021 View Post
    There is any difference when to use "if" and "in case (of)"?
    There is, actually.
    If introduces a condition; in case introduces a possibility:
    I will take an umbrella if it rains. (only if there's rain, I'll take an umbrella; otherwise, I won't)
    I will take an umbrella in case it rains. (whether or not there's rain, I'll take an umbrella)

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    Default Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Don't confuse 'in case' and 'in case of'.

    'in case' means (taking an umbrella) as a safeguard against something happening, or being true.

    'in case of' means 'in the event that something DOES happen:
    "In case of fire, do not use elevators."

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    Arrow Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Don't confuse 'in case' and 'in case of'.

    'in case' means (taking an umbrella) as a safeguard against something happening, or being true.

    'in case of' means 'in the event that something DOES happen:
    "In case of fire, do not use elevators."
    David, I can't see any confusion there
    I'll take an umbrella in case of rain. = I'll take an umbrella in case it rains/in case there's rain.

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    svartnik is offline Banned
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    Default Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    I'll take an umbrella in case of rain. = I'll take an umbrella in case it rains/in case there's rain.
    They do not mean the same thing, eng.

    In the first sentence, your taking an umbrella is dependent upon whether it will rain or not.
    By contrast, the second sentence is independent in this respect; it implies a measure taken (taking an umbrella) beforehand to prevent harm (getting wet).
    Last edited by svartnik; 12-May-2009 at 02:22.

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    Cool Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    They do not mean the same thing, eng.
    But only when you compare the two:
    In case of fire, do not use elevators. (ie In the event of fire, that is to say when this happens, do not use elevators).
    vs
    I'll take an umbrellan in case of rain. (ie I'll take an umbrella whatever the weather).

    As I said earlier on, I'll take an umbrella in case of rain and I'll take an umbrella in case it rains/in case there's rain mean the same thing.


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    svartnik is offline Banned
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    Default Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    But only when you compare the two:
    The word "same" implies comparison.

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    As I said earlier on, I'll take an umbrella in case of rain and I'll take an umbrella in case it rains/in case there's rain mean the same thing.

    You are drawing invalid comparison here, if you ask me.

    In case of fire, do not use the elevator - it means when the house is already burning, do not go that way.
    By analogy,
    I will take an umbrella in case of rain means your taking of an umbrella is contingent on the weather; your taking an umbrella is dependent on the fulfillment of a condition: that it it will rain.
    I will take an umbrella in case of rain suggests condition similarly to the sentence with "if" in place of "in case of".
    I will take an umbrella in case it rains is independent of any condition; your taking an umbrella has been already decided.

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    Cool Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    The word "same" implies comparison.

    You are drawing invalid comparison here, if you ask me.

    In case of fire, do not use the elevator - it means when the house is already burning, do not go that way.
    I'm afraid to say, you're dead wrong about it, Svartnik. And so is David L., if he still insists on disagreeing with me.

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    By analogy,
    I will take an umbrella in case of rain means your taking of an umbrella is contingent on the weather; your taking an umbrella is dependent on the fulfillment of a condition, that it it will rain. no
    I will take an umbrella in case of rain suggests condition similarly to the sentence with "if". no; in case and if are absolutely different
    I will take an umbrella in case it rains is independent of any condition; your taking an umbrella has been already decided. yes; and that's why you can't substitute in case for if in such a case

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    Default Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    I'm afraid to say, you're dead wrong about it, Svartnik. And so is David L., if he still insists on disagreeing with me.
    This argument won you the debate

    I will take my umbrella in case of rain.
    What does it mean?
    I will wait and see whether it will rain in the future, at the time, say, I will have to leave home for concert. If it will rain that time, I will take an umbrella, but if it will not, I will go to the concert without an umbrella.

    I will take an umbrella in case it rains.
    It means I am precautious, so I will take an umbrella with me to avoid possibly getting wet.

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    Thumbs up Re: "If" vs "in case (of)"

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    This argument won you the debate
    It did, did it?

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