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  1. #1
    dodgerfan2002 Guest

    that/which (restrictive clause)

    I have something that might work
    I have something which might work

    which one? thanx

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: that/which (restrictive clause)

    Quote Originally Posted by dodgerfan2002
    I have something that might work
    I have something which might work

    Which one?
    I prefer the first one.


  3. #3
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    Re: that/which (restrictive clause)

    Quote Originally Posted by dodgerfan2002
    I have something that might work
    I have something which might work

    which one? thanx
    I agree with Ronbee.

    Here's something you may find of interest:

    Many writers use which for restrictive clauses, and you can find examples in my writing, in Fowler’s Modern English Usage 1965, and in most modern style guides which say that either that or which can be used with restrictive clauses.

    For those writers who use which restrictively, there remains a preference for that in clauses referring back to the words anything, nothing, something, or everything, e.g. Can you think of anything that still has to be done?

    That preference is derived, in part, from stress and rhythm. The word that contains “soft” sounds and is usually unstressed, whilst which contains a “harder” initial sound and is easier to stress. Several writers note that that tends to be preferred in speech, which may be due to the comparative ease with which that is and similar phrases can be contracted, for example to that’s, compared with the equivalent expressions using which.

    Though you can use which instead of that in restrictive clauses, you can’t do so the other way round: non-restrictive start with ,which. It's the comma that tells the reader that which is functioning non-restrictively.

    If your sense of the language is not strong enough to be sure of the right pronoun, use that for the restrictive cases and which for the others and you won’t go wrong.

    Source http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/which.htm



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