Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Mehrgan's Avatar
    Mehrgan is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,587
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Cockney rhyming slang

    Hi there,
    I'd like to put this question to the dear English...Is it possible for all the English people to get what these items of slang used in London mean? I mean, to EFL speakers the rhyming slang sounds more like a puzzle or Sth, as you're not sure when they're used...Slang is said to be a part of every day speech and i wonder if the Londoners use it frequently or just when they make some fun of Sth...Plus, what's the dominant accent in London, and how can we get any info about it? (sorry for making it that long! Thanks...) (Btw, can any Londoner kindly give me more clues about it?)

  2. #2
    konungursvia's Avatar
    konungursvia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,763
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    They use it all the time: example: take a butcher's [hook].... have a look. My toil and strife... my wife.

  3. #3
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi there,
    I'd like to put this question to the dear English...Is it possible for all the English people to get what these items of slang used in London mean? I mean, to EFL speakers the rhyming slang sounds more like a puzzle or Sth, as you're not sure when they're used...Slang is said to be a part of every day speech and i wonder if the Londoners use it frequently or just when they make some fun of Sth...Plus, what's the dominant accent in London, and how can we get any info about it? (sorry for making it that long! Thanks...) (Btw, can any Londoner kindly give me more clues about it?)

    Metropolitan London has an approximate population of 7,200,000 in an area of 174 square miles. There is no single or dominant accent.

    Rhyming slang is characteristic of Cockney, which is the dialect spoken by relatively few people, those who are born and raised within the City of London and particularly within the sound of the bells of Bow church. Many of the terms have become accepted outside that district and are used without any sense of ridicule.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,533
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    Rhyming slang is used in other regions too- Australia has its own, for instance. Also, much of it was originally meant to be a puzzle so that only insiders would understand.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    cockey rhyming slang is very rarely used today although my mum would probably say well i use it dont i. anyone who uses it around you is teasing you. join in have a go yourself. its fun. tease them back with some of your own slang. the dominant language. there is none. there is urdu chinese polish slovac french german spanish cheq jamaican ethiopian indian afrikaan swedish hungarian scottish irish welsh russian english

  6. #6
    mmasny is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,704
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    Quote Originally Posted by abbi46 View Post
    cockey rhyming slang is very rarely used today although my mum would probably say well i use it dont i. anyone who uses it around you is teasing you. join in have a go yourself. its fun. tease them back with some of your own slang. the dominant language. there is none. there is urdu chinese polish slovac french german spanish cheq jamaican ethiopian indian afrikaan swedish hungarian scottish irish welsh russian english
    Could you please use capitals, commas, and apostrophes? It's hard to read a longer paragraph without them.

  7. #7
    Mehrgan's Avatar
    Mehrgan is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,587
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    And, how about Estuary English? I hear it's a standard version of Cockney, or the one which is influenced by the upper social class....

    Thanks in advance.

  8. #8
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,473
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    'cockey rhyming slang is very rarely used today ' You probably do, without knowing it. I learnt words like 'butchers' and 'berk' and 'use your loaf' long before I had heard of CRS. And many viewers knew - e. g. - that the TV series 'Porridge' would be set in a prison, even without seeing it - 'borage and thyme/time'.

    And if you want to know what 'berk' means, this is a family show. (The first word is Berkshire'.)

    There are articles about CRS and Estuary English somewhere on this site, but I can't find them for now.

    b

  9. #9
    magimagicE is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'cockey rhyming slang is very rarely used today ' You probably do, without knowing it. I learnt words like 'butchers' and 'berk' and 'use your loaf' long before I had heard of CRS. And many viewers knew - e. g. - that the TV series 'Porridge' would be set in a prison, even without seeing it - 'borage and thyme/time'.

    And if you want to know what 'berk' means, this is a family show. (The first word is Berkshire'.)

    There are articles about CRS and Estuary English somewhere on this site, but I can't find them for now.

    b

    Something to do with hunts, I believe...


    Anyway, just to confirm that CRS is still in use in London.

    The proper way is not to include the rhyming part of the slang. So, for "boat race" [face], we would just say "boat".

    "Why is there lipstick on your boat?"


    Borasic is another commonly used term, especially in this current economic climate.

    But not so borasic as to turn away a pair of Claires during the big discount sales.

  10. #10
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,418
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Cockney rhyming slang

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Rhyming slang is used in other regions too- Australia has its own, for instance. Also, much of it was originally meant to be a puzzle so that only insiders would understand.
    Yes, here, 'to have a look' is 'to take a Captain Cook.'
    No doubt this slang came out with convicts from the hulks moored in the Thames in east London.
    I'm not a big fan, and certainly no exponent!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. MA thesis on rhyming slang
    By Scotney Twist in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2009, 17:16
  2. How to learn/use slang properly?
    By thedaffodils in forum English Slang
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Aug-2008, 02:22
  3. Favourite movies, slang -a time, a place
    By David L. in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Aug-2008, 14:14
  4. New References of English Idioms, Slang and Swearing
    By Red5 in forum News and Announcements
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-Jun-2005, 20:31
  5. Cockney Rhyming Slang
    By Anonymous in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2003, 21:52

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk