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Thread: Vice Versa

  1. #1
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    Default Vice Versa

    If these are not correct, why? What do they mean?

    1. Do shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny? (What's the subject and what's the verb?)
    2. Does shifting from R to D and vice versa does a lot of harm to your tranny?
    3. Does shifting from R to D and does shifting from vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?

    Eg. What's the subject and verb? = What's the subject and what's the verb?
    For the last one above, it doesn't sound right with vice versa? How should I repair it?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Vice Versa

    Do shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?
    Do shifting from R to D and vice versa = subject
    do (2nd) = verb

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Vice Versa

    Do shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?
    Do shifting from R to D and vice versa = subject
    do (2nd) = verb
    I don't really get your explanation, sorry. Could you explain it again? How come it is not this:
    1. Does shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?

    Do shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?
    Do shifting from R to D and vice versa = subject
    do (2nd) = verb
    2. 'Do shifting from R to D and vice versa' =one subject? Or did you mean two subjects? If so, how is it two subjects? How come my verb is 'do'?
    Thanks.
    Last edited by jack; 11-Jan-2005 at 09:30.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Vice Versa

    Are these correct? If not, why?

    What is the subject and what is the verb for these?
    1. What does it mean when I use 'teeth' instead of 'tooth' and vice versa?
    2. What do they mean when I use 'teeth' instead of 'tooth' and vice versa?

    Thanks.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Vice Versa

    The subject is underlined, the main verb is in green, and the auxiliary verb is in pink:

    1. *Do shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?
    2. Does shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?
    3. Does shifting from R to D and does shifting *from vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?

    The statement is as follows:

    Shifting from R and D and vice versa does a lot of harm to your tranny.

    The question formation works like this,

    Statement: Shifting from R and D and vice versa does . . . .
    Subject-Verb Inversion: Does shifting from R to D and vice versa . . . ?
    DO Insertion: Does shifting from R to D and vice versa do . . . ?

    Back to our examples 1, 2, and 3 above. The first one is ungrammatical. The subject is singular, so the verb must be singular, as in 2. Sentence 3 is OK except for *from visa versa. vice versa should be an adverb in that context, but it functions as a noun. The preposition "from" takes a noun as its object, so you may want to delete "from":

    . . . and shifting vice versa. . . . (how?, where?)

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Vice Versa

    Thanks, that is very clear.

    1. *Do shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?
    One more thing, how is it not two subjects? How do you know? Like subject one is 'shifting from R to D' and subject two is 'vice versa' or is it because 'vice versa' is an adverb?

    2. Do shifting from R to D and redlining your tranny do a lot of damage to the engine? (Do I have two subjects now? If not, why? Could you show me a two subject one? Also, as I mentioned before #1 has only one subject because 'vice versa' is an adverb? Is that why #2 has two subjects?)

    Thanks.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Vice Versa

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Thanks, that is very clear.
    You're welcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    One more thing, how is it not two subjects? How do you know? Like subject one is 'shifting from R to D' and subject two is 'vice versa' or is it because 'vice versa' is an adverb?
    The gerund phrase "Shifting from R to D" represents one act, one event, so it one noun phrase. We know this because we can replace it with a singular pronoun: It or Doing this (i.e., shifting gears) does a lot of harm to your tranny.

    As for "vice versa", the conjunction "and" joins two gerunds:

    Shifting from R to D and shifting vice versa (i.e., from D to R)

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    2. Do shifting from R to D and *redlining your tranny do a lot of damage to the engine? (Do I have two subjects now?)
    Yes, but what's *"redlining"?

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Also, as I mentioned before #1 has only one subject because 'vice versa' is an adverb? Is that why #2 has two subjects?

    1. *Do shifting from R to D and vice versa do a lot of harm to your tranny?
    2. Do shifting from R to D and redlining your tranny do a lot of damage to the engine?
    Sentence 1. has one subject: the gerund phrase "Shifting. . ." The conjunction "and" joins "from R to D" with "vice versa". They tell is how. They function as adverbs. In 2., the conjunction "and" joins two gerund phrases: "shifting from R to D" with *"redlining your tranny".

    Sentence 2. has two subjects because the nouns "Shifting" and *"redlining are different. Sentence 1. has one subject because the noun "Shifting" is the same:

    1. Shifting from R to D and (shifting) vice versa. . . .
    2. Shifting from R to D and *redlining your tranny. . . .

    By the way, jack, when referring to an example from another post, it's much more easier on us if you could copy and paste it in your new post. Otherwise, we're flipping up and down looking for example #1, 1. and so on. Moreover, if you label an example "1.", then use 1. consistently. Using #1 or (1) is confusing.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Vice Versa

    Yes, but what's *"redlining"?
    That's when you drive your car too hard and that makes your tachometer go to the red lines.

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