Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default to + infinitive+ing

    Dear Teacher,

    I read the following clause:

    We look forward to receiving your order...

    Generally I thought that we never use infinitive+ing after to.

    When do we use this grammar?

    Please advice,

    Rinot


  2. #2
    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,819
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: to + infinitive+ing

    Quote Originally Posted by rinotg View Post
    Dear Teacher,

    I read the following clause:

    We look forward to receiving your order...

    Generally I thought that we never use infinitive+ing after to.

    When do we use this grammar?

    Please advice,

    Rinot
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...-question.html
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...tical-not.html
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...ogressive.html
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...something.html

  3. #3
    sau is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: to + infinitive+ing

    Quote Originally Posted by rinotg View Post
    Dear Teacher,

    I read the following clause:

    We look forward to receiving your order...

    Generally I thought that we never use infinitive+ing after to.

    When do we use this grammar?

    Please advice,

    Rinot

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: to + infinitive+ing


    Engee 30 Hi,

    first I would like to thank you for your reply.

    Is the phrasal verbs have the same role as idioms ? and
    how can I identify that it's phrasal vers and not simple verb with preposition, for example you wrote "I hope to hear from you"
    as a person that not speak english daily I can think that" hope to" is also phrasal verb (verb + preposition).

    please clarify this issue

    Rinot

  5. #5
    engee30's Avatar
    engee30 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,819
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: to + infinitive+ing

    Quote Originally Posted by rinotg View Post
    Engee 30 Hi,

    first I would like to thank you for your reply.

    Is the phrasal verbs have the same role as idioms ? and In most cases, yes - they are like idioms
    how can I identify that it's phrasal vers and not simple verb with preposition, for example you wrote "I hope to hear from you" In this case, the to is an infinitive; I hate to disappoint you, but the best thing to make sure what to is is by looking a particular phrase up in a dictionary
    as a person that not speak english daily I can think that" hope to" is also phrasal verb (verb + preposition). Like I said earlier, no it is not

    please clarify this issue

    Rinot

  6. #6
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: to + infinitive+ing

    Quote Originally Posted by rinotg View Post
    ... how can I identify that it's phrasal vers and not simple verb with preposition, for example you wrote "I hope to hear from you"
    as a person that not speak english daily I can think that" hope to" is also phrasal verb (verb + preposition).

    please clarify this issue

    Rinot
    The easiest way to tell is to use the words "something" and "do" after "to". For example,

    • I look forward to something. <noun>
    • I look forward to do something. <verb>
    • I look forward to doing something. <noun: gerund>
    • I hope to do something. <verb>
    • I hope to something. <noun>
    • I hope to doing something <noun:gerund>


    This may also help http://writingcenter.gmu.edu/resourc...word_verbs.pdf

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    38
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: to + infinitive+ing

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    The easiest way to tell is to use the words "something" and "do" after "to". For example,

    • I look forward to something. <noun>
    • I look forward to do something. <verb>
    • I look forward to doing something. <noun: gerund>
    • I hope to do something. <verb>
    • I hope to something. <noun>
    • I hope to doing something <noun:gerund>

    This may also help http://writingcenter.gmu.edu/resourc...word_verbs.pdf
    Thank you for your reply.

    Sorry but I didn't understand the examples , I will appreciate if you can give me more example for the" easiest way"
    As for the link I opened it and it is very clear but just to be sure that I understand the list has phrasal verbs which mean that whenever I use to + verb after those phrasal verbs I must use present participle , am I correct ?

    Kindly reply,

    Rinot

Similar Threads

  1. [General] Perfect Continuous Infinitive
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Mar-2009, 17:36
  2. [General] to fail + Infinitive / not fail + Infinitive
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Feb-2009, 18:25
  3. [General] bar infinitive
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20-Dec-2008, 15:54
  4. infinitive or bare infinitive?
    By miniwave in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Jun-2006, 11:08
  5. about 'to + infinitive'
    By sariputra in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-May-2005, 09:11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •