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  1. Anonymous
    Guest
    #1

    To Hypenate or Not?

    I've been unable to find any rules on hyphenation of adjective phrases such as "freshly-squeezed". I recall that when I studied English many years ago hyphenation was more common. When is the hyphenation appropriate?
    This example is used here because of a post to a different forum for "pet peeves" of grammatical errors. The ubiquitous "fresh squeezed" is mine.
    I blame the advertising industry, which evidently does not require passing grades in English grammar! :wink:

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    #2
    Some argue that the hyphen is unnecessary, so it is a grey area. I use it to lock the two words together to show that they are inseparable andd equal. In your example, it makes sense because the squeezing would be nothing if it were not recent.

  2. Will
    Guest
    #3
    So what is it called when you use a hyphen to seperate a sentence and a phrase after the sentence - like this. (Sorry, about the example; I couldn't think of a better one off the top of my head.)

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      • British English
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    #4
    When used as punctuation, it is called a 'dash'.

    BTW- separate.

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