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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    two sets to love

    Ive heard this kind of comment a couple of times on a tennis TV coverage: Federer will serve to a two sets to love lead. Why not Federer will serve to a two-set-to-love lead?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: two sets to love

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    Ive heard this kind of comment a couple of times on a tennis TV coverage: Federer will serve to a two sets to love lead. Why not Federer will serve to a two-set-to-love lead?
    Well, they could say that too. Why do you prefer the latter?
    "Serving to a lead" sounds strange to me, but I don't follow sports much.

  3. beachboy's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: two sets to love

    Ive learned that I can only say, for example: I have a 10-dollar bill, or Hes a 36-year-old tennis player, because the underlined words work as adjectives. I cant understand why there are two possibilities in relation to the first sentence I posted...

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