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  1. #1
    lnln56 Guest

    Default Giving reasons using "because of" and "for"

    Does "because of" mean the same as "for"? What is the rule for using "because of" or "for" to give reasons?

    Starbucks is famous for its coffee.
    Starbucks is famous because of its coffee.


    In the above examples, "because of" and "for" appear to be interchangeable, But in the examples below they are not interchangeable.

    He was late because of traffic.
    He was late for traffic.

    She succeeded because of her parents.
    She succeeded for her parents.

    Because of and for are both followed by a noun or noun phrase. How can I identify when to use because of and when to use for?

  2. #2
    Ryonan is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Giving reasons using "because of" and "for"

    Quote Originally Posted by lnln56 View Post
    Does "because of" mean the same as "for"? What is the rule for using "because of" or "for" to give reasons?

    Starbucks is famous for its coffee.
    Starbucks is famous because of its coffee.


    In the above examples, "because of" and "for" appear to be interchangeable,
    Right, there is no problem and difference using "Because of" and "for" in this case


    Quote Originally Posted by lnln56 View Post
    But in the examples below they are not interchangeable.

    He was late because of traffic.
    He was late for traffic.

    She succeeded because of her parents.
    She succeeded for her parents.
    No, These sentences carry differents meaning with "because of" and "for"
    He was late because of traffic => The traffic is terrible and he can't come on time
    He was late for traffic. => There is no meaning at all, as an example :
    He was late for school : he didn't go to school on time


    Quote Originally Posted by lnln56 View Post
    Because of and for are both followed by a noun or noun phrase. How can I identify when to use because of and when to use for?
    Depend on the context, but first understand their meaning.

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