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Thread: comparatives

  1. #1
    hermanpineda is offline Newbie
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    Default comparatives

    which comparatives can be used with either -er or more?

    thanks.

    Herman

  2. #2
    wise owl is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: comparatives

    Adjectives that are shorter than 3 syllables, are normally used with "er".
    For example:
    big - bigger
    short - shorter

    Adjectives that are longer than 3 syllables, are normally used with "more".
    For example:
    difficult - more difficult
    comprehensible - more comprehensible

    However, there may be exceptions with the short adjectives, which are sometimes used with "more" and not "er". I can't think of an example at the moment.

    Also, there are exceptions such as "good - better - the best"; "bad - worse - the worst"

  3. #3
    csheywood's Avatar
    csheywood is offline Member
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    Default Re: comparatives

    Quote Originally Posted by hermanpineda View Post
    which comparatives can be used with either -er or more?
    Hello
    Very few. Usually only the 2-syllable adjectives which end in 'y' are given 'er', not all 2-syllable adjectives, eg careful= more careful. The rules tell us that it is generally either 'er' or 'more' and this is the easiest way to learn. Exceptions can be frustrating!

    However there is confusion with the adverbs that are 2-syllables and end in 'y'. In theory, there is no reason why we shouldn't use 'er' after 'quickly, slowly, brightly'. Sometimes I do', but sometimes I use 'more slowly'.

    In addition, 'quickly' is an example of an adverb, which can be used in the comparative, but 'hardly' isn't.

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