Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: would've/would

  1. #1
    nyota's Avatar
    nyota is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    615
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question would've/would

    What's the difference in this context:

    1. Much as we'd have liked to go to the party, I'm afraid we can't, because we'll be in London that day.

    2. Much as we'd like to go to the party, ...


    Help appreciated

  2. #2
    csheywood's Avatar
    csheywood is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Romania
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    136
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: would've/would

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    What's the difference in this context:

    1. Much as we'd have liked to go to the party, I'm afraid we can't, because we'll be in London that day.

    2. Much as we'd like to go to the party, ...


    Help appreciated
    Actually no difference in the meaning, but I would say that No 1. shouldn't be written like this since it implies that the party has happened. It hasn't. No 2. is correct. If you heard /read this in an informal setting then remember even native English speakers muddle up the 'would have's with the 'would's.

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    18,362
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: would've/would

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    what's the difference in this context:

    1. Much as we'd have liked to go to the party, i'm afraid we can't, because we'll be in london that day.
    we would have liked to go, but we have decided we can't. So it is no longer appropriate to say 'we would like to go'.

    we would have liked to go; but we can't, so we don't.
    this is more likely to be said after it has been established that they can't go.
    i'm afraid we
    can't go to the party, because we'll be in london that day. It's a pity because we would have liked to go.

    2. Much as we'd like to go to the party, ...
    this is more likely to be said before an explanation is given that they can't go.
    much as we'd like to go to the party, i'm afraid we can't, because we'll be in london that day.


    put another way:
    If a person invites you to a party, and you can't go, you would normally
    first say, "i would like to go, but ..."
    once the person understands that you cannot go, you can reassure them with "i would have liked to go..."


    as you say, the difference is merely in context.
    help appreciated
    r.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk