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  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default "doubts" or "questions"?

    I have doubts about English.

    I have questions about English.

    What's the right way please?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    "Doubts" means you have some problems with or about an issue regarding English - something negative.

    "Questions" could refer to something negative too , but could also mean that you merely need some answers to the issues you are not sure of.

  3. #3
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    thanks.
    supposing you had to name a folder to keep questions (or doubts) you had about a matter, would you use "questions" or "doubts" please?
    thanks.

  4. #4
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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    I have now seen literally hundreds of posts using the word "doubts" when "questions" is more appropriate.

    I would label that folder "questions."

    Sometimes someone will ask a question. Someone will answer. Then the first person comes back and says "I still have a doubt." That's unintentionally insulting. The person means "I still have a question" but how it reads is "I am suspicious about the correctness of your answer."

  5. #5
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I have now seen literally hundreds of posts using the word "doubts" when "questions" is more appropriate.

    I would label that folder "questions."

    Sometimes someone will ask a question. Someone will answer. Then the first person comes back and says "I still have a doubt." That's unintentionally insulting. The person means "I still have a question" but how it reads is "I am suspicious about the correctness of your answer."
    Thanks a lot.
    That's precisely the point.
    In English the word "doubt" should only be used when there's some degree of suspicion or disbelief?
    Thanks again.

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    Suspicion may have been too stong a word, but generally, yes, you have it.

    Let's say your sister is going to bring home her new boyfriend. It turns out he is a marine biologist, and you want to know more about what he does.

    If you say "I have doubts about him" it means you don't think your sister should date him.

    If you say "I have questions to ask him" it could be because you want to know more about marine biology.


    Another example: Someone tells you they went to London for vacation. You want to know about the hotel they stayed at, because you may want to stay there too.

    If you say "I have doubts about that" it sounds like you don't believe they went to London.

    I think you've got it!

  7. #7
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    Thanks.
    Supposing that I hear an explanation from someone but fail to fully understand what is told, should I say "I have a doubt about what you said" or "I have a question..."?
    Thanks again.

  8. #8
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    If you say to someone "I have a doubt about what you said" you have just said, essentially, "I think something you told me was not true. I think you just lied to me about something." I'm sure that's not what you want to say.

    Say "I have a question." Better yet, say "Can I ask a question about something you just said?"

  9. #9
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "doubts" or "questions"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If you say to someone "I have a doubt about what you said" you have just said, essentially, "I think something you told me was not true. I think you just lied to me about something." I'm sure that's not what you want to say.

    Say "I have a question." Better yet, say "Can I ask a question about something you just said?"
    Thank you very very much.

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