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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    English/Japanese Confusion

    Q> In English: "You don't need this right away, do you?"

    A> In English: "No, I don't."

    A> In Japanese: "Yes, I don't."


    What Grammar Terminology is referred to with the the difference between
    the "No" and the "Yes"?

    Thank you very much for your time and help.
    Curious

  2. #2
    VanTMV Guest

    Re: English/Japanese Confusion

    Oh I have the same question, can anyone explain for me the using of “Yes” and “No”
    Long time ago, I learnt from some Vietnamese teachers, they taught me using ‘Yes’ and ‘No’, Yes for positive and No for negative
    Means:
    "You don't need this right away, do you?"

    "No, I don't."

    Or : you don’t need this?
    No, I don’t
    And I always use it, but then, in my Speaking – listening class, sometime Im trying use Yes, I don’t, they still understand or accept that

    By the way, Japanese people in my company have a freaky accent of English, especially with the word ‘r’ and ‘t’. I always talk with them as least as possible
    Uh oh, sorry, no related things

    Thank you

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    Re: English/Japanese Confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered
    Q> In English: "You don't need this right away, do you?"

    A> In English: "No, I don't."

    A> In Japanese: "Yes, I don't."


    What Grammar Terminology is referred to with the the difference between
    the "No" and the "Yes"?

    Thank you very much for your time and help.
    Curious
    They are called question tags, or tag questions, and here's how they work:

    1) If the tag is affirmative (do, have, are), then the response is negative (don't, haven't, am):

    Affirmative tag => Negative response
    . . . , do you? | No, I don't.
    . . . , have you? | No, I haven't. OR No, I don't.
    . . . , are you? | No, I am not.

    2) If the tag is negative, then the response is affirmative, like this,

    Negative tag => Affirmative response
    . . . , don't you? | Yes, I do.
    . . . , haven't you? | Yes, I have. OR Yes, I do.
    . . . , aren't you? | Yes, I am.

    Now, native speakers focus on the tag verb (do), whereas learners of English focus on the main verb (don't need):

    EX: "You don't need this right away, do you?"

    English speaker: No, I don't (need this right away).
    Japanese speaker: Yes. I don't (need it right away).

    What the Japanese speaker means is, "Yes, that's correct. I don't need it right away." So, if we add in the phrase "that's correct", the response is perfectly fine:

    Yes, that's correct. I don't.

    If you're having problems with tags, just add in the words "that's correct" or "that's incorrect":

    Yes, that's correct. I don't.
    No, that's incorrect. I do.

    Here is an example of a Japanese tag:

    Yuki: empitsu ga nai, ne? (You don't have a pencil, do you?)
    Miho: Aru, yo. (Yes, I do.)

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