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  1. #1
    fire fly is offline Junior Member
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    Question "To the north of"

    “To the north & “in the north”
    I have found one example of “to the north” in an Advanced Oxford Dictionary i.e. “He lives to the north of here”. I understand that we use “to the north” not “in the north” in this sentence because we have a preposition “of” after “to the north”. Am I right? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    svartnik is offline Banned
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    Default Re: "To the north of"

    Quote Originally Posted by fire fly View Post
    “To the north & “in the north”
    I have found one example of “to the north” in an Advanced Oxford Dictionary i.e. “He lives to the north of here”. I understand that we use “to the north” not “in the north” in this sentence because we have a preposition “of” after “to the north”. Am I right? Thanks in advance.
    Yes.

  3. #3
    fire fly is offline Junior Member
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    Wink Re: "To the north of"

    Many thanks.

  4. #4
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    engee30 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "To the north of"

    Quote Originally Posted by fire fly View Post
    “To the north & “in the north”
    I have found one example of “to the north” in an Advanced Oxford Dictionary i.e. “He lives to the north of here”. I understand that we use “to the north” not “in the north” in this sentence because we have a preposition “of” after “to the north”. Am I right? Thanks in advance.
    You say to the north of somewhere when talking about direction; you say in the north of somewhere when talking about position.

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "To the north of"

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    You say to the north of somewhere when talking about direction; you say in the north of somewhere when talking about position.
    That's one distinction. Here's another:
    I live in the south of Brisbane. If I lived to the south of Brisbane, I wouldn't live in Brisbane at all.

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