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  1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Smile as handsome a young man as

    1) He was as handsome a young man as ever walked along the streets of London."
    2) He is as handsome as the young man

    I don't understand the word order of the first sentence in the above.
    Is it possible ' He was as handsome as a young man ever walked along the streets of London as a same meaning?
    Could you explain why " a young man" comes before "as"?

    "as ...as" in the number 1 and that of the number 2 is the same meaning and the same function, isn't it?
    Does the second 'as' in the number 1 function as a relative pronoun?


    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Re: as handsome a young man as

    I am not a teacher, but I am a native speaker.

    The first sentence actually sounds quite awkward. It should probably be written "As handsome as ever, the young man walked along the streets of London."

    It does not really make sense as it is.

  3. #3
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Re: as handsome a young man as

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    1) He was as handsome a young man as ever walked along the streets of London."
    2) He is as handsome as the young man

    I don't understand the word order of the first sentence in the above.
    Is it possible ' He was as handsome as a young man ever walked along the streets of London as a same meaning?
    Could you explain why " a young man" comes before "as"?

    "as ...as" in the number 1 and that of the number 2 is the same meaning and the same function, isn't it?
    Does the second 'as' in the number 1 function as a relative pronoun?


    Thanks in advance.
    1. "As handsome a young man as ever....." = a young man as handsome as any young man that had ever walked the streets of London.

    2. The as....as has the same meaning and function as in 1.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: as handsome a young man as

    Quote Originally Posted by jackolantern View Post
    I am not a teacher, but I am a native speaker.

    The first sentence actually sounds quite awkward. It should probably be written "As handsome as ever, the young man walked along the streets of London."

    It does not really make sense as it is.
    It does make sense, as bhai has indicated. It doesn't mean what you've written.
    Here are some similar sentences:
    She is as pretty a girl as I've ever seen. I have not seen a prettier girl.
    This is as good a job as I can expect.
    I cannot expect a better job than this.

  5. #5
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Re: as handsome a young man as

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    1) He was as handsome a young man as ever walked along the streets of London."
    2) He is as handsome as the young man

    I don't understand the word order of the first sentence in the above.
    Is it possible ' He was as handsome as a young man ever walked along the streets of London as a same meaning?
    Could you explain why " a young man" comes before "as"?

    "as ...as" in the number 1 and that of the number 2 is the same meaning and the same function, isn't it?
    Does the second 'as' in the number 1 function as a relative pronoun?


    Thanks in advance.
    The structures are different, hence your confusion. The second 'as' of #1 is indeed a relative pronoun, whereas the second 'as' of #2 is a conjunction.

    The reason for the word order 'as handsome a young man' is that 'as' belongs to the same group of submodifying adverbs that precede rather than follow the article. Others are 'too' and 'so' (too big a house, so great a blow, etc.).

  6. #6
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    Re: as handsome a young man as

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It does make sense, as bhai has indicated. It doesn't mean what you've written.
    Here are some similar sentences:
    She is as pretty a girl as I've ever seen. I have not seen a prettier girl.
    This is as good a job as I can expect.
    I cannot expect a better job than this.

    Ahhh, you're right. I don't know why I didn't pick up on that.

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