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  1. #1
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Lightbulb bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    Do the Britons who live between England and Scotland pronounce 'bad' as [ba:d]?

    I think a in 'bad' is pronounced as 'a' in apple.

    It sounds interesting. Any comment? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    So far as I am aware, apart from any regionalisms, that is the way most people will say "bad" "sad" "dad "fad" "mad".

  3. #3
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your answer.

  4. #4
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    [ba:d] is "bard"; Shakespeare is sometimes called the Bard of Avon (the place where he was born).

    As Anglika says, this may be a regionalism. But in my experience of many Northern accents, the RP // is often replaced a different vowel, but not a long one.

    A Northerner imitating my (London - but on the RP side, rather than the Cockney ) accent used to replace the RP /ʌ/ (of "buck", "duck" ... etc ) with [a:].

    b

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    orangutan is offline Member
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    I think for many British people /ae/ undergoes some phonetic lengthening before voiced consonants (possibly not all of them, I can't remember the exact rule).

    Contrast: "bad" vs "bat", "bag" vs "back"

  6. #6
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    Thank you for your replies.

  7. #7
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    [ba:d] is "bard"; Shakespeare is sometimes called the Bard of Avon (the place where he was born).

    As Anglika says, this may be a regionalism. But in my experience of many Northern accents, the RP // is often replaced a different vowel, but not a long one.



    b
    Bard for bad looks like a Northern Irish pronounciation.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    Quote Originally Posted by orangutan View Post
    I think for many British people /ae/ undergoes some phonetic lengthening before voiced consonants (possibly not all of them, I can't remember the exact rule).

    Contrast: "bad" vs "bat", "bag" vs "back"
    Yes, this applies to most English, not just British. Many vowel sounds and diphthongs are lengthened before a voiced consonant.
    Compare also:
    write - ride
    neat - need
    root - rude
    clout - clowd
    ...

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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    clout - clowd
    You mean cloud?

  10. #10
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: bad = [ba:d]? (British accent)

    Quote Originally Posted by stefan_kar View Post
    You mean cloud?
    Yes. I must have been thinking crowd and clown and writing cloud.

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