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  1. #11
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    Quote Originally Posted by Abdo
    We pit (sb/sth) against (sb/sth)
    Agreed.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    tdol:
    Subject- Federal child pornography laws
    Verb- have been
    Advocate= a person who supports something, and there are many of them, hence the plural.
    Casiopea:
    Simple Subject: laws
    Verb: have been
    Object: a bone of contention

    Simple Subject: pitting (gerund, singular noun)
    Verb: advocates(singular verb)


    How come tdol said 'advocate' was a noun and Casiopea said it was a verb? Which one is it?
    Last edited by jack; 26-Jan-2005 at 07:52.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    How come tdol said 'advocate' was a noun and Casiopea said it was a verb? Which one is it?
    It's a difficult sentence to parse, jack, even for native speakers.

    The subjects are underlined and the main verbs are in green:

    1. Federal child pornography laws have been a bone of contention for nearly a decade, pitting police and victims' rights advocates against civil libertarians and creative artists.
    1. Federal child pornography laws have been a bone of contention for nearly a decade [because] pitting police and victims' rights advocates against civil libertarians and creative artists.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb


    ..... pitting police and victims' rights advocates .....
    For sentences like that one, how do I figure out if it has two subjects or one? How can you tell if it is a mistake or not? Like if it is one whole subject like this: 'pitting police and victims'. Or it is two subjects like this 'pitting police' and 'victims' rights' Also, do you have a website where can I read about that.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by jack; 26-Jan-2005 at 12:12.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    1. Federal child pornography laws have been a bone of contention for nearly a decade, pitting police and victims' rights advocates against civil libertarians and creative artists.
    For sentences like that one, how do I figure out if it has two subjects or one?
    Easy, jack. If there are two verbs, then there are two subjects.
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    How can you tell if . . . it is one whole subject like this: 'pitting police and victims'. Or it is two subjects like this 'pitting police' and 'victims' rights'.
    "pitting (against)" is a gerund made by adding -ing to the verb "to pit". Gerunds function as subject and as objects. As subjects they occur before a verb, and "advocates", note the -s, is a verb.

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Also, do you have a website where can I read about that.
    Sorry. Your guess is as good as mine. Try an online search. Use some of the key words in the sentence.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    I find it hard to distinguish between gerunds and objects. What is the subject and what is the verb for these? How do you distinguish them? And what do these mean?
    1. Chasing him and following him is not good ideas.
    1. Chasing him and following him are not good ideas.
    2. Chasing him and chasing with him is not a good idea.
    2. Chasing him and chasing with him are not a good idea.

    Thanks.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    I find it hard to distinguish between gerunds and objects. What is the subject and what is the verb for these? How do you distinguish them? And what do these mean?
    1. Chasing him and following him is not good ideas.
    1. Chasing him and following him are not good ideas.
    2. Chasing him and chasing with him is not a good idea.
    2. Chasing him and chasing with him are not a good idea.

    Thanks.
    Only nouns can act as subjects, jack, so if they -ing word comes before the verb, it's a noun.

    The subject comes before the verb, the object comes after the verb.

    If the verb is singular (is) then the subject is treated as singular. If "and" joins the subject, then both nouns are treated together, as a single event, as in 1. and 2. (Sorry, but you failed to mark your examples, so you'll have to figure out which ones I mean by '1. and 2.')

    If the verb is plural (are) then the subject is treated as a plural event, as in 1. and 2. (Again, you'll have to figure out which '1. and 2.'--the examples are not labelled correctly.)

  8. #18
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    Reemy is offline Member
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    Dear Jack,
    I think that "pitting…against" is a verbal phrase, and " advocates" here its object. Let's put it in this way .
    "1. Federal child pornography laws have been a bone of contention for nearly a decade; a matter which pits police and the advocates of victims' rights against civil libertarians and creative artists. This is the only way I can see it a correct analysis for the sentence.

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    1. Chasing him and following him are not good ideas.
    2. Chasing him and chasing with him is not a good idea.
    If these are not correct, why? What do they mean?
    1. Shifting from R to D and redlining your tranny are not good. (Do I have two subjects right here? If this is wrong, why is #1 in the quote correct?)
    2. Shifting from R to D and redlining your tranny is not good. (One subject?)

    Thanks.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Subject and Verb

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    If these are not correct, why? What do they mean?
    1. Shifting from R to D and redlining your tranny are not good. (Do I have two subjects right here? If this is wrong, why is #1 in the quote correct?)
    2. Shifting from R to D and redlining your tranny is not good. (One subject?)

    Thanks.
    Example 1. has two gerund phrases (underlined) acting as two separate subjects. Example 2. has two gerund phrases (underlined) acting as one subject. For both examples, either "is" or "are" is fine. Choosing "is" or "are" depends on whether you want the subject to be one single event (as in 2.) or two separate events (as in 1.):

    1. Doing these two things: shifting and red-lining are not good. (plural)
    2. Doing this one thing: shifting and red-lining is not good. (singular)

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