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    #11

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    That too, but I was taking the inchoative/causative distinction you'd made. I don't see 'the official bribed' as working as a sentence.

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    #12

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    That too, but I was taking the inchoative/causative distinction you'd made. I don't see 'the official bribed' as working as a sentence.
    I admit it isn't a perfect example, but it could work in statements about generic qualities.

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    #13

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    Even then, I think I'd use a passive:

    Most officials can be bribed.
    Most officials can bribe.

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    #14

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Even then, I think I'd use a passive:

    Most officials can be bribed.
    Most officials can bribe.
    I see.

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    #15

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    I put up a poll on this issue and the first answer said that both 'can passivize' and 'can be passivized' were wrong, so we have some conservative friends onsite.

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    #16

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I put up a poll on this issue and the first answer said that both 'can passivize' and 'can be passivized' were wrong, so we have some conservative friends onsite.
    I'ts a shame they didn't say why.

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    #17

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    The more I look at this sentence, the more I feel it's fine in the 'can passivise' form.

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    #18

    Re: Can "passivize" be used intransitively?

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    The more I look at this sentence, the more I feel it's fine in the 'can passivise' form.
    As Old Blue Eyes said, "that's witchcraft".


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