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  1. #1
    Honore is offline Junior Member
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    Default A Sentence from "Anna Karenina"

    Dear Teacher,

    The sentence "Do you suppose I could help knowing?" has been translated in the unabridged Turkish version of the subject book in the meaning "Do you think I do not know?".

    Does the "can/could help gerund" structure always work similarly?

    Source:
    Anna Karenina : Part Two. : Chapter 3 by Leo Tolstoy @ Classic Reader (The tenth line from top)

    Regards

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: A Sentence from "Anna Karenina"

    It means that it was impossible for the person not to know to me.

  3. #3
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: A Sentence from "Anna Karenina"

    Quote Originally Posted by honore View Post
    dear teacher,

    the sentence "do you suppose i could help knowing?" has been translated in the unabridged turkish version of the subject book in the meaning "do you think i do not know?".

    it's not a good translation. (either the russian to turkish, or your turkish to english).
    There is certainly a difference in meaning between:
    "i knew it" and "i couldn't help knowing it"

    does the "can/could help gerund" structure always work similarly?
    the positive phrase " ... I could help <verb>ing" is not as common as the negative " ... I couldn't help <verbing>ing"


    regards
    r.
    PS: Please disregard the mangled capitalisation: I'm working on it.

  4. #4
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    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: A Sentence from "Anna Karenina"

    I agree, it probably should be "How could I not have known?"

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