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  1. #1
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default use the word asleep as a adverb

    According to the dictionary the word "asleep" is normally used as a adjective
    and can also be used as an adverb. What is an example of a sentence where it is used as a adverb?

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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    What is an example of a sentence where [asleep] is used as a adverb?
    EX: I can't fall asleep. ("asleep" modifies the verb "fall")

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    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Thanks for the example.

    I assume that inserting the word "fast" , a adverb, does not change "asleep" to be a adjective:

    I can fall fast asleep.


    Also, isn't "asleep" a adjective in this sentence:

    I fell asleep.

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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    Thanks for the example.
    I assume that inserting the word "fast", an adverb, does not change "asleep" to an adjective: I can fall fast asleep. Also, isn't "asleep" a adjective in this sentence: I fell asleep.
    You're welcome.

    "asleep" functions as an adverb in both examples. It modifies the verb "feel" by describing how you fell, how your state of consciousness descended.

    Adverbs answers the questions, Who?, Where?, When?, How?, and Why.

    Adverb
    I fell asleep
    Test: How did I fall? => Answer: asleep

    I fell fast asleep
    Test: How did I fall? => Answer: fast asleep

    Adjective
    I am asleep.
    Test: What are you? => Answer: asleep

    I fell asleep.
    Test: *What are you fell? => Answer: asleep (* means, ungrammatical)

  5. #5
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Ok, now I am confused.

    Code:
    Adverbs answers the questions, Who?, Where?, When?, How?, and Why.
    Adverb
    The baby was fast asleep.
    Test: How was the baby? => Answer: fast asleep

    Adjective
    The baby was fast asleep.
    Test: What is the baby? => Answer: asleep


    In the sentence above "asleep" is suppose to be a adjective not a adverb, but it passes the test for it to be a adverb.

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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Here's a trick that might help: "is", and other forms of the verb To Be, is a linking verb. The only adverbs that linking verbs co-occur with are those that express time and location, like this,

    The baby is in bed. (Where? In bed. (adverb))
    The baby was in bed at 6 p.m. (When? At 6 p.m. (adverb))

    The baby was asleep. (adjective)

  7. #7
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Your example:

    The baby is in bed.

    "in" is a preposition, "bed" is a noun.
    Is "in bed" an adverbial phrase?

    Unfortunately I still can not tell when a word is definately a adverb.
    In some sentences the test to use to determine what the word is
    passes both the test for adverb as well as the test for adjective as I demonstrated in my previous example.

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    eurekateam is offline Junior Member
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    Smile The difference between disinterested end uninterested?

    What is the difference between disinterested end uninterested?

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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    Your example:

    The baby is in bed.

    "in" is a preposition, "bed" is a noun.
    Is "in bed" an adverbial phrase?
    Yes. It's a prepositional phrase in form (that's what it looks like) and an adverbial phrase in function (that's what it does). Every word can be divided into two categories: 1) What it looks like, its form, and what it does, its function. "in bed" is a prepositional phrase, made up of the preposition "in" and the noun "bed", and together the phrase "in bed" answers the question Where? That is, it tells us where the baby is located. If a word or a phrase answers Why?, Where?, When, and How? then it functions as an adverb.

    [QUOTE}Unfortunately I still can not tell when a word is definately a adverb.
    In some sentences the test to use to determine what the word is
    passes both the test for adverb as well as the test for adjective as I demonstrated in my previous example.[/QUOTE]

    Well, try asking the WH questions, and if that fails, remember that only adverbs of time and place occur with linking verbs. Try a few more sentences; post them here if you want, and we'll go through them together.

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    Default Re: The difference between disinterested end uninterested?

    Quote Originally Posted by eurekateam
    What is the difference between disinterested end uninterested?
    disinterested means, impartial, whereas uninterested means, not interested.

    Note, if you have a reply, please post it under a new heading. The topic of this thread deals with the adverb "asleep".

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