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  1. #11
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Given these sentences:

    I was fast asleep.
    I can fall fast asleep.
    I fall fast asleep.

    In the first sentence "was" is a linking verb, "fast" is a adverb, "asleep" is a adjective.

    In the second sentence "fall" is a linking verb, "fast" is a adverb and "asleep" is a adverb.

    Why is "asleep" in the second sentence a adverb (it has exactly the same
    structure as the first sentence)?

    Is "asleep" also a adverb in the third sentence?

  2. #12
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    I was fast asleep.
    I can fall fast asleep.
    I fall fast asleep.
    Why is "asleep" in the second sentence a adverb (it has exactly the same
    structure as the first sentence)?
    Different verbs: 1. is copular, whereas 2. and 3. are not. "asleep" functions as an adverb in 2. and 3. It modifies the verb.

    In 1. "asleep" modifies a noun, the subject. Adjectives describe people, places, and things; adverbs "add to" the meaning of verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.

  3. #13
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    What about these sentences:

    I fall fast asleep.
    He went fast asleep.

    "asleep" is a adverb in the first sentence.
    "asleep" is a adjective in the second sentence.

    Both sentences seem like they are structured the same.
    Unless the difference is because "fall" is a linking verb and "went" is not.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    What about these sentences:

    I fall fast asleep. ("asleep" is a adverb)
    He went fast asleep. ("asleep" is an adjective)

    Both sentences seem like they are structured the same.
    Unless the difference is because "fall" is a linking verb and "went" is not.
    Well, "asleep" describes how I fall, and how I went. It describes the verb, so it functions as an adverb in both sentences. If we look at a linking structure, we see that "asleep" described the subject, which is a noun, not the verb:

    I am fast asleep. (I = asleep; "asleep" is an adjective. It describes a noun)

    With linking structures, the subject complement modifies the subject, and since "I" a noun, "asleep" functions as an adjective in that structure.

    Compare:

    I fell asleep. (verb+adverb)
    I was asleep. (Linking Structure: subject = adjective)

  5. #15
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Examining the different sentences using the word "asleep"

    Copular verb type

    1) The baby was fast asleep. was->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adjective
    2) The baby was asleep fast. was->verb, asleep->adjective, fast->adverb

    Linking verb type

    3) The baby seems fast asleep. seems->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adjective
    4) The baby seems asleep fast. (bad form for sentence)
    5) The baby sounds fast asleep. sounds->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adjective
    6) The baby sounds asleep fast. (bad form for sentence)
    7) The baby appears fast asleep. appears->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adjective
    8) The baby appears asleep fast. (bad form for sentence)

    Common verb type

    9) The baby went fast asleep. went->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adverb
    10) The baby went asleep fast. went->verb, asleep->adverb, fast->adverb
    11) The baby fell fast asleep. fell->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adverb
    12) The baby fell asleep fast. fell->verb, asleep->adverb, fast->fast

    Is the following true?

    1) In both sentences 9 and 10 the meaning of the sentence is different
    even though "fast" and "asleep" are both adverbs?
    The same is true for sentences 11 and 12?

    2) A copular verb can have a adjective after the verb. That adjective must describe the subject of the sentence.

    3) For all Linking verbs word order must be adverb/adjective.
    (covers examples 4, 6 and 8.)

    4) No adjectives can follow a common verb to describe the subject.
    They are adverbs.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Are the following true?
    1) True.

    2) True. The adjective either directly or indirectly modifies the subject:

    Direct: She is great.
    'great' modifies 'She' directly.

    Indirect: She is a great singer.
    'great' directly modifies 'singer', and 'a great singer' modifies 'She', so 'great' indirectly modifies 'She'.

    3) True in general, but there are a few exceptions. Here's one:

    Example: They are good enough. (adjective+adverb)

    'enough' functions as an adverb in that context. It's called a post-modifier.

    4) No adjectives can follow a common verb to describe the subject. They are adverbs.

    Common verb type
    9) The baby went fast asleep. went->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adverb
    10) The baby went asleep fast. went->verb, asleep->adverb, fast->adverb
    11) The baby fell fast asleep. fell->verb, fast->adverb, asleep->adverb
    12) The baby fell asleep fast. fell->verb, asleep->adverb, fast->fast
    True. Only linking verbs allow adjectives to reach back across the verb to modify the subject. That's because linking verbs represent a grammatical equals sign (=). For example,

    The baby is asleep.
    The baby = asleep.

    Below, the modified word is underlined:

    Example: The baby is alseep. (adjective)
    Example: The baby fell asleep. (adverb)

  7. #17
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    You can be fast asleep, but you can't be asleep fast.


  8. #18
    notmyname216 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    You can be fast asleep, but you can't be asleep fast.
    Are you sure? What about these sentences:

    1) I went asleep fast. went->verb, asleep->adverb, fast->adverb
    2) Asleep fast I went. <not a vaild sentence?>
    3) Asleep fast went I. asleep->adverb, fast->adverb, went->verb

  9. #19
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    Are you sure? What about these sentences:

    1) I went asleep fast. went->verb, asleep->adverb, fast->adverb
    2) Asleep fast I went. <not a vaild sentence?>
    3) Asleep fast went I. asleep->adverb, fast->adverb, went->verb
    Ronbee was pointing out the verb "be", a linking verb. Your examples do not house a linking verb.

  10. #20
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: use the word asleep as a adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by notmyname216
    Are you sure? What about these sentences:

    1) I went asleep fast. went->verb, asleep->adverb, fast->adverb
    2) Asleep fast I went. <not a vaild sentence?>
    3) Asleep fast went I. asleep->adverb, fast->adverb, went->verb
    Unfortunately, none of those sentences work. The expression is: "I went to sleep." Example:
    A: What time did you go to sleep last night?
    B: I went to sleep last night at about nine o'clock.
    One might, possibly, say, "I fell asleep quickly" (It didn't take long) but not, "I fell asleep fast."


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