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  1. #1
    sykim99 is offline Junior Member
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    Default the right meaning of "groan"

    On the test paper "what is the meaning of "groan"?

    one of the examples was
    "to say that you are not satisfied with something"

    Does it explain right the meaning of "groan"?

  2. #2
    susiedqq is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: the right meaning of "groan"

    Groan can be a verb or noun.

    "giving a groan" is an idiom


    John groaned when he lifted the weight.

    John gave a groan when he saw the price of the car.

    John groaned, "I can't see the show."

  3. #3
    sykim99 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: the right meaning of "groan"

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    Groan can be a verb or noun.

    "giving a groan" is an idiom


    John groaned when he lifted the weight.

    John gave a groan when he saw the price of the car.

    John groaned, "I can't see the show."
    Thanks
    Is it o.k. if I use the word "groan" when I am not satisfied with something?

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: the right meaning of "groan"

    Quote Originally Posted by sykim99 View Post
    Thanks
    Is it o.k. if I use the word "groan" when I am not satisfied with something?
    No, 'groan' does not mean 'complain'. Nor is it a word that one uses when one wants to complain. A dictionary might help you.

  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
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    Default Re: the right meaning of "groan"

    No? You don't have the expression "moan and groan"?

    It's not my first choice for "complain" but "They got home late, tired, and hungry, moaning and groaning about the length of the drive and the traffic" is pretty natural.

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: the right meaning of "groan"

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    No? You don't have the expression "moan and groan"?

    It's not my first choice for "complain" but "They got home late, tired, and hungry, moaning and groaning about the length of the drive and the traffic" is pretty natural.
    Yes, we sure do have the expression.
    But here is the question I was responding to:
    Is it o.k. if I use the word "groan" when I am not satisfied with something?
    My meaning was: No, you cannot go up to a salesman and say "I wish to groan about something".

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: the right meaning of "groan"

    To clarify:
    You can use 'groan' to mean 'complain' when you are talking about someone else. But you'd have to be careful using it in the first and second person.
    The words are not synonymous.
    Besides, you can "groan" with pleasure, but not many people complain with pleasure.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: the right meaning of "groan"

    To be very literal, a groan is a sound we make. It sounds like ohhhhhhhh spoken in a very low pitch, for example. This sound is made when you are unhappy or disappointed about something.

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