English Idioms & Idiomatic Expressions

Showing 251-300 of 335 results for letter 'B'
Break your duck
(UK) If you break your duck, you do something for the first time.
Break your heart
If someone upsets you greatly, they break your heart, especially if they end a relationship.
Breakneck speed
If something happens at breakneckspeed, it happens very quickly, often at dangerous speed.
Breathe down your neck
If someone follows you or examines what you're doing very closely, they are breathing down your neck.
Breathe life into
If you breathe life into something, you give people involved more energy and enthusiasm again.  ('Breathe new life' is also used.)
Breathe your last
When you breathe your last, you die.
Brevity is the soul of wit
The best way to communicate intelligently is to be concise and not to use unnecessary words.
Bridge the gap
If you bridge the gap, you make a connection where there is a great difference.
Bright and breezy
When someone is cheerful and full of energy, they are bright and breezy.
Bright as a button
A person who is as bright as a button is very intelligent or smart.
Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed
If someone's bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, they are full of energy and enthusiasm.
Brighten up the day
If something brightens up your day, something happens that makes you feel positive and happy all day long.
Bring a knife to a gunfight
If someone brings a knife to a gunfight, they are very badly prepared for something.
Bring home
If you bring something home, you explain it or make it very clear.
Bring home the bacon
A person who brings home the bacon earns the money that a family live on.
Bring on board
To make people embrace the ideas intended by the leader or agree to join a team or project is to bring them on board.
Bring someone to book
If somebody is brought to book, they are punished or made to account for something they have done wrong.
Bring someone to heel
If you bring someone to heel, you make them obey you.('Call someone to heel' is also used.) 
Bring the curtain down
If you bring the curtain down on something, you bring it to a end.
Bring the house down
Something that brings the house down is acclaimed and praised vigorously.
Bring to the table
If you bring something to the table, you make a contribution or an offer in a discussion or negotiation.
Broad church
If an organisation is described as broad church, it is tolerant and accepting of different opinions and ideas.
Broad strokes
If something is described or defined with broad stokes, then only an outline is given, without fine details.
Broke as a joke and it ain't funny
This idiom in my opinion describes how it's not funny to be without a cent and just uses broke and joke as rhyming words that help explain this idiom a lot better.
Broken record
When someone sounds like a broken record, they keep on repeating the same things. ('Stuck record' is also used.)
Broken reed
If something or someone fails to give you the support you were hoping for, they are a broken reed.
Brown as a berry
Someone who is very sun tanned is brown as a berry.
Brown nose
When someone tries to make themselves popular with somebody, usually in a position of authority, especially by flattering them, they are brown nosing.
Browned off
To be tired of or fed up with
Brownie points
If you try to earn Brownie points with someone, you do things you know will please them.
Brush under the carpet
If you brush something under the carpet, you are making an attempt to ignore it, or hide it from others.
Brush with death
If someone comes very close to dying but live, they have a brush with death.
Buck stops here
The buck stops here is used to say that this is the point where responsibility lies or the person who is responsible.
Buggles' turn
(UK) If it Buggles' turn, someone gets promotion through length of service rather than ability, especially in the British civil service.
Built like a Mack Truck
(USA) This is a common phrase used in the US among its citizens to refer to something that is rugged and solidly built that will provide years of reliable service. It can be a reference to a person, building, piece of furniture, a structure, etc.
Bull in a China shop
If someone behaves like a bull in a China shop, they are clumsy when they should be careful.
Bull market
A bull market is a period when investors are optimistic and there are expectations that good financial results will continue.
Bull session
If you have a bull session, you have an informal group discussion about something.
Bull-headed
If you're a bull-headed, you're stubborn or inflexible.
Bums on seats
The people who have paid to watch a performance are bums on seats.
Bun in the oven
If a woman has a bun in the oven, she is pregnant.
Bundle of nerves
Someone who is a bundle of nerves is very worried or nervous.
Bur under my saddle
A bur under your saddle is something that annoys you or spurs you into action.('Burr' is an alternative spelling.)
Burn rubber
If you burn rubber, you drive very fast to get somewhere.
Burn the candle at both ends
Someone who burns the candle at both ends lives life at a hectic pace, doing things which are likely to affect their health badly.
Burn the midnight oil
If you stay up very late working or studying, you burn the midnight oil.
Burn your bridges
If you burn your bridges, you do something that makes it impossible to go back from the position you have taken.
Burn your fingers
If you burn your fingers, you suffer a loss or something unpleasant as the result of something you did, making you less likely to do it again.
Burning daylight
Burning daylight is wasting time.
Burning question
A burning question is something we all want to know about.

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