Idiom Category: Clothes, Page 2

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Keep your pants on
If someone tells you to keep your pants on, they mean that you should be patient and not make them rush.
Keep your shirt on!
This idiom is used to tell someone to calm down.
Keep your wig on!
(UK) This idiom is used to tell someone to calm down.
Kick up your heels
(USA) If you kick up your heels, you go to parties or celebrate something.
Kick your heels
(UK) If you have to kick your heels, you are forced to wait for the result or outcome of something.
Kid gloves
If someone is handled with kid gloves, they are given special treatment and handled with great care.
Knickers in a twist
When your knickers are in a twist, you are angry and snappish over something trivial. 'Whenever he loses his car keys, he gets his knickers in a twist.'
Knock into a cocked hat
If you knock something or someone into a cocked hat, you are much better.
Knock your socks off
If something knocks your socks off, it amazes and surprises you, usually in a positive way.
Laugh up your sleeve
If you laugh up your sleeve, you laugh at someone secretly.
Lay a glove on
If you lay a glove on someone, you strike a blow against them in an argument, dispute, etc.  (Mostly used in the negative)
Lick someone's boots
If you lick someone's boots, you behave in a very servile manner and try to please someone.
Lose your shirt
If someone loses their shirt, they lose all their money through a bad investment, gambling, etc.
Notch on your belt
A success or achievement that might help you in the future is a notch on your belt.
Off the cuff
If you do something off the cuff, you do it without any preparation.
Old hat
If something's old hat, it seems rather old fashioned and dated.
On pins and needles
If you are on pins and needles, you are very worried about something.
Only the wearer knows where the shoe pinches
This means that it's hard to know how much someone else is suffering..
Out of pocket
If you are out of pocket on a deal, you have lost money.
Pass the hat
If you pass the hat, you ask a people  in a group to give money.
Pop your clogs
When someone pops their clogs, they die.
Pull up your socks
If you aren't satisfied with someone and want them to do better, you can tell them to pull up their socks.
Pull yourself up by your bootstraps
If you pull yourself up by your bootstraps, you make the effort to improve things for yourself.
Pull yourself up by your bootstraps
If you pull yourself up by your bootstraps, you improve your problem or situation by your own efforts, without anyone else's help.
Put a sock in it
If someone tells you to put a sock in it, they are telling you to shut up.
Put it on the cuff
If you put something on the cuff, you will take it now and pay for it later.
Put on your thinking cap
If you put on your thinking cap, you think very hard about something.
Put yourself in someone's shoes
If you put yourself in someone's shoes, you imagine what it is like to be in their position.
Roll up your sleeves
If you roll up your sleeves, you get ready to start working hard.
Shoe is on the other foot
If the shoe is on the other foot, someone is experiencing what they used to make others experience, normally negative things.
Shoestring
If you do something on a shoestring, you try to spend the absolute minimum amount of money possible on it.
Show someone a clean pair of heels
If you show someone a clean pair of heels, you run faster than them when they are chasing you.
Smarty pants
A smarty pants is someone who displays the intelligence in an annoying way.
Soft shoe
Speaking to someone or a speech given in a gentle or conciliatory way.
Stuffed shirt
A stuffed shirt is a person who is very serious or formal.
Take to your heels
If you take to your heels, you run away.
Take your hat off
If you say that you take your hat off to someone, you are showing your respect or admiration.
Take your hat off to somebody
If you take your hat off to someone, you acknowledge that they have done something exceptional or otherwise deserve your respect.
Talk out of your hat
If someone is talking out of their hat, they're talking utter rubbish, especially if compounded with total ignorance of the subject on which they are pontificating. ('Talk through your hat' is also used.)
Throw down the gauntlet
Throw down the gauntlet is to issue a challenge to somebody.
Throw your hat in the ring
If someone throws their hat in the ring, they announce that they want to take part in a competition or contest. 'Toss your hat in the ring' is an alternative.
Tighten your belt
If you have to tighten your belt, you have to economise.
Too big for your boots
If someone is too big for their boots, they are conceited and have an exaggerated sense of their own importance.
Too big for your britches
If someone is too big for their britches, they are conceited and have an exaggerated sense of their own importance.
Tough as old boots
Something or someone that is as tough as old boots is strong and resilient.
Trail your coat
If you trail your coat, you act in a provocative way.
Under someone's heel
If you are under someone's heel, they have complete control over you.
Under your belt
If you have something under your belt, you have already achieved or experienced it and it will probably be of benefit to you in the future.
Velvet glove
This idiom is used to describe a person who appears gentle, but is determined and inflexible underneath. ('Iron fist in a velvet glove' is the full form.)
Walk a mile in my shoes
This idiom means that you should try to understand someone before criticising them.

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