English Idioms & Idiomatic Expressions

Showing 101-150 of 155 results for letter 'I'
In the lap of luxury
People in the lap of luxury are very wealthy and have have everything that money can buy.
In the limelight
When you are in the limelight, you are at the center of attention.
In the long run
This means 'over a long period of time', 'in the end' or 'in the final result'.
In the loop
If you're in the loop, you are fully informed about what is happening in a certain area or activity.
In the lurch
If you are left in the lurch, you are suddenly left in an embarrassing or tricky situation.
In the making
When something is in the making, it means it is in the process of being made.
In the offing
If something is in the offing, it is very likely to happen soon.
In the pink
If you are in very good health, you are in the pink.
In the pipeline
If something's in the pipeline, it hasn't arrived yet but its arrival is expected.
In the red
If your bank account is overdrawn, it is in the red.
In the running
If you have a reasonable chance, you're in the running.
In the saddle
If you're in the saddle, you are in control of a situation.
In the same boat
If people are in the same boat, they are in the same predicament or trouble.
In the short run
This refers to the immediate future.
In the soup
If you're in the soup, you're in trouble.
In the swim
If you are in the swim, you are up-to-date with and fully informed about something.
In the swing
If things are in the swing, they are progressing well.
In the tall cotton
A phrase that expresses good times or times of plenty and wealth as tall cotton means a good crop.
In the twinkling of an eye
If something happens in the twinkling of an eye, it happens very quickly.
In the zone
If you are in the zone, you are very focused on what you have to do.
In turn
This means one after the other. Example: She spoke to each of the guests in turn.
In two minds
If you are in two minds about something, you can't decide what to do.
In your blood
A trait or liking that is deeply ingrained in someone's personality and unlikely to change is in their blood.  A similar idiom is 'in his DNA.'
In your element
If you are in your element, you feel happy and relaxed because you are doing something that you like doing and are good at. "You should have seen her when they asked her to sing; she was in her element."
In your face
If someone is in your face, they are direct and confrontational. (It is sometime written 'in yer face'colloquially)
In your sights
If you have someone or something in your sights, they are your target to beat.
Indian file
If people walk in Indian file, they walk in a line one behind the other.
Indian giver
An Indian giver gives something, then tries to take it back.
Indian summer
If there is a period of warmer weather in late autumn, it is an Indian summer.
Ins and outs
If you know the ins and outs of something, you know all the details.
Inside story
The inside story is information or an explanation that is known only by people closely involved with something.
Into each life some rain must fall
This means that bad or unfortunate things will happen to everyone at some time.
Into thin air
If something vanishes or disappears without trace, it vanishes into thin air; no-one knows where it has gone.
Iron fist
Someone who rules or controls something with an iron fist is in absolute control and tolerates no dissent. An iron fist in a velvet glove is used to describe someone who appears soft on the outside, but underneath is very hard. 'Mailed fist' is an alternative form.
Iron in the fire
If you have an iron in the fire, you have a project, undertaking or plan of action; having several irons in the fire means you have more than one.
Irons in the fire
A person who has a few irons in the fire has a number of things working to their advantage at the same time.
Is Saul also among the prophets?
It's a biblical idiom used when somebody known for something bad appears all of a sudden to be doing something very good.
It ain't over till the fat lady sings
This idiom means that until something has officially finished, the result is uncertain.
It cost an arm and a leg
If something costs an arm and a leg, it is very expensive indeed.
It cost the earth
If something costs the earth, it is very expensive indeed.
It is what it is
This is used when a person, place or thing is behaving in accordance with their nature, so that behavior should be accepted or expected even if it is not what you would like.
It never rains but it pours
'It never rains but it pours' means that when things go wrong, they go very wrong.
It takes a village to raise a child
It takes many people to teach a child all that he or she should know.
It takes all kinds to make a world
Diversity is essential- the world would be incomplete if everyone were alike.('It takes all sorts to make a world' is also used.)
It takes two to tango
This idiom is used to suggest that when things go wrong, both sides are involved and neither side is completely innocent.
It's an ill wind that blows no good
This is said when things have gone wrong; the idea being that when bad things happen, there can also be some positive results.
It's as broad as it is long
(UK) Used to express that it is impossible to decide between two options because they're equal.
It's been a slice
(USA) When someone leaves and you have said your goodbyes it is usually the last thing you may say..........It's been a slice. I use it after a visit where we have had a good time.
It's no use crying over spilt milk
This idiom means that getting upset after something has gone wrong is pointless; it can't be changed so it should be accepted.
It's not the size of the dog in fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog
Usually refering to a small dog attacking a larger animal, this means that fierceness is not necessarily a matter of physical size, but rather mental/psychological attitude.

> If you have a question about idioms, ask us about it in our Idioms Discussion Forum. If you know of an idiom that you would like to be listed here, please use our online form to suggest an idiom.

Members Get More - Sign up for free and gain access to many more idioms and slang expressions. Register now.