Recent content by Steven D

  1. S

    communicative courses are the need of the day.

    Yes, language courses should be communicative. Classes should be interactive and not always teacher-centered. Presentations are an important part of the learning and teaching process, but activities that involve the active participation of the students are necessary in order to make the ESL...
  2. S

    communicative courses are the need of the day.

    I would certainly say that grammatical accuracy is important for communication in general. Communicative lessons and courses include grammatical accuracy as well. Though it may not be the intention, it seems that the implication here is that grammatical accuracy is only an exam issue...
  3. S

    Must and have to

    One thing about "must" is that it is often used for rules and regulations. If a speaker uses "must" it often communicates something more serious. They're sometimes interchangeable as well. It depends on the context. I've heard students use "must" when "have to" would be more...
  4. S

    Understanding the accent

    You can practice listening on the internet. You can download MP3s at some sites. http://www.elllo.org/months/england.htm http://www.elllo.org/study/england/english_2004.htm http://www.elllo.org/study/england/english_2005.htm http://www.elllo.org/months/ireland.htm...
  5. S

    *~Neither of ~*

    This is a usage issue. In this sentence use "are" - plural verb. In this case it certainly sounds more natural after a plural noun - students. Also, we might consider that "neither of them" means more than one. But that's something else.
  6. S

    drunk & drunken

    This is a legal distinction. The dictionary doesn't necessarily agree here. It just points out that the law sees it this way. Drunk and drunken are sometimes used to make a legal distinction, whereby a drunk driver is a driver whose alcohol level exceeds the legal limit, and a drunken driver...
  7. S

    drunk & drunken

    There are some very influential people who believe in many things.
  8. S

    drunk & drunken

    The distinction struck me as odd when I first came across it. After reviewing the dictionary definitions, I feel the same way. I don't think there's any real distinction here. But if the dictionary says so, then I guess we should go along with it. I'll look at the usage note again and the...
  9. S

    drunk & drunken

    I understand what "others" think here, but it's not what I think. If one is inebriated, one should not drive. If one is drunken, one should also not drive. One could have a couple drinks and be neither drunken nor inebrieated when it comes time to get behind the wheel later in the evening...
  10. S

    drunk & drunken

    I should still like to say, however, that I do not find this to be a genuine distinction. :-|
  11. S

    drunk & drunken

    I would like to see neither a drunken driver behind the wheel nor an inebriated driver behind the wheel. I can't see the distinction, especially where driving is concerned. It may be a legal distinction, but I would not call it a practical one based on the definitions of these two words...
  12. S

    drunk & drunken

    In all seriousness, I would say that's a distinction hardly worth considering. :-|
  13. S

    Which one is right

    Yes, it's entirely wrong, but it seems as though it's been catching on. :shock: So I guess if everyone is still using it by the end of the century, we'll be able to say it's correct. ;-) We could say it must be a new phrase, or it must be a new expression. ;-)...
  14. S

    Which one is right

    You would, wouldn't you? 8-) 8-) Sincerely, Top of Mind
  15. S

    Which one is right

    So, you have no interest in top of mind awareness? No top of mind concerns to speak of? Sincerely, Top of Mind
Top