Recent content by yun

  1. Y

    during vs while

    (A)We stayed one night in this hotel while visiting Paris. (B) We stayed one night in this hotel during visiting Paris. I understand the sentence (B) is considered as incorrect. I also know "during" is followed by a noun and "while" is by a clause. But in case of (B), if "visiting" is a gerund...
  2. Y

    the more + the more

    Thank you very much for your answer. But I still have a question. In your example, there are two comparatives at least, though the first doesn't come at the beginning of the sentence. According to the syntax of your example, the sentence I picked up shall be rephrased as follows. "However, the...
  3. Y

    the more + the more

    I found the following sentence on the internet. The syntax is grammatically correct? However, the images tend to fade the longer they remain blind. I think it shall be "However, the more the images tend to fade, the longer they remain blind." I have not heard that in "the more ~ the more"...
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    regret doing vs regret having done

    I know the difference in the meaning between “regret + gerund” and “regret + infinitive” (A) regret + doing: feel sorry about what I did in the past. (B) regret + to do: feel sorry about what I will do now. However, I don’t exactly understand what difference exists in the below two sentences...
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    Comparative of Inferiority

    An English study book I read says, "He is less stupid than I thought he was is better expressed by either He is not so stupid as I thought he was or He is cleverer than I thought he was. The book does not explain why they are considered as better expressions. Instead, it lists some more...
  6. Y

    to study or studying

    Most English grammar books in Korea say infinitive has a feature of future/being specific while gerund has a feature of past(completion)/being general. Therefore, the books explain infinitive is more appropriate than gerund in the sample sentence. (Anyone can easily note that studying is not...
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    to study or studying

    Thank you for your help again. My question is; In the two sentences, both gerund and infinitive are used like a noun. So, I don't get it why you say "this doesn't happen with the to". Do you mean "becoming" is more like a noun and "to become" is not? Please see following syntax. Noun A is...
  8. Y

    to study or studying

    Please advise me which sentence is more natural and why it is. (A) My aim is studying harder. (B) My aim is to study harder. Thank you.
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    Gerund vs Infinitive

    Dear Raymott, I am sorry to keep asking questions. But, could you give an explanation why the first sentence is terrible? What's wrong with the gerund in here?
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    Gerund vs Infinitive

    Dear Raymott, How about this? (A) I studied hard for (my) passing the exam. (B) I studied hard to pass the exam. (A) sounds awkward, doesn't it?
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    Gerund vs Infinitive

    Dear Raymott, Basically, my question is whether gerund can be used or not in this syntax. Someone explained to me that the doorman is holding the door for her not for the action of passing through, so it is incorrect. How about your example? The police cleared the road for the Queen's passing...
  12. Y

    Gerund vs Infinitive

    Are you a native speaker? I am sorry but I need a serious answer with a grammatical explanation.
  13. Y

    Gerund vs Infinitive

    Thank you for your prompt reply. Would you explain the reason? In fact, I can't see any grammatical problem.
  14. Y

    Gerund vs Infinitive

    I have two questions about following two sentences (A) The doorman held the door for her passing through. (B) The doorman held the door for her to pass through. Q1. If both sentences are grammatically correct? Q2. If they are, what is the difference in the meaning? Thank you.
  15. Y

    than + bare infinitive

    Dear Pedroski, Thank you very much for your reply. A Canadian on another ESL site answered me that bare infinitive can be used after than. "The SR did much more than simply (to) occupy territories." However, I can't find such a rule in grammar books that "to" can be left out after "than"
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