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  1. Q

    aliment of consciousness

    I am reading Trip to Hanoi by Susan Sontag. She visits Hanoi Vietnam in 1968 during the war with America. She is writing on how Vietnamese respects Norman Morrison, a Baltimore Quaker who immolates himself in front of the Pentagon to protest US involvement in Vietnam war. "The Vietnamese...
  2. Q

    remark on

    I am reading "Trip to Hanoi" by S. Sontag. She visits Hanoi Vietnam in 1968 during the war with America. Firstly she gets culture shock and feels uncomfotable. Later on, it was better. "The first sign was that I became more comfortable in talking to people: not only to Oanh, our chief...
  3. Q

    will

    I am reading Trip to Hanoi by Susan Sontag She visits Hanoi Vietnam in 1968 during the war with America. "It wasn’t that I’d expected to feel at ease in North Vietnam, or to find the Vietnamese as a people exactly like Europeans and Americans. But neither had I expected to be so baffled, so...
  4. Q

    hadn’t registered the proper surprise

    I am reading Trip to Hanoi by Susan Sontag She visits Hanoi Vietnam during the war with America. She hears the guide's story about two women general in AD 40 which was over one thousand years earlier than Joan of Arc. "The first successful Vietnamese uprising against foreign rule, in AD 40...
  5. Q

    The green man was universal

    I am reading Midwinter Break by MacLaverty. This is the story of Gerry and Stella, a North Irish couple, in their early sixties, off on a 4-day holiday to Amsterdam. Now, wake up and does not see his wife, Gerry is going out to look for her. "He had to cross a main road rumbling with traffic...
  6. Q

    Isn’t it enough that their struggle is, objectively, just?

    I am reading Trip to Hanoi by Susan Sontag She visits Hanoi during the war with America. She feels uncomfortable with Vietnamese language when they call American solders are "cruel thugs" or South Vietnam government are henchmen. " There’s a committee here (someone had left a piece of...
  7. Q

    Good for the bowls and jugs

    I am reading Midwinter Break by Bernard MacLaverty. A man goes to breakfast room in his hotel at Amsterdam. "He gathered himself some cereal from the buffet and proceeded to a table set for two beside the window. Since Belfast, he always sat in a chair facing the door. Prunes on top of...
  8. Q

    to the sound of vacuum cleaners

    I am reading Midwinter Break by Bernard MacLaverty. A man was in hotel. He let his room. "In the corridor the girls in lilac housecoats dodged in and out from room to trolley to the sound of vacuum cleaners. They all seemed to be foreign – from Thailand or Puerto Rico." I do not understand...
  9. Q

    didn’t the powers that be

    I am reading Midwinter break, a book of an Irish novelist. The District Council began building an estate of council houses to rent in the village and people were asked to apply. A poor family prayed that they would get a four-bedroom house there. They even did a novena of Masses. "But when the...
  10. Q

    without one’s even having to bestir oneself

    I am reading A trip to Hanoi by S. Sontag. There is a sentence I do not understand so please enlighten me the meaning of underlined word: "In my own case, several years of reading and of viewing newsreels had furnished a large portfolio of miscellaneous images of Vietnam: napalmed corpses, live...
  11. Q

    Single X

    I am reading Midwinter Break by B. Maclaverty "He’d just been to lunch with two of the other architects. They all knew they had work to do in the afternoon so they drank only porter. Single X. A pint each. Helped them keep a clear head because it wasn’t strong. It wasn’t considered drinking –...
  12. Q

    What gets you by

    In Midwinter Break by B. Maclaverty, a couple went to an Irish pub. The husband is an alcoholic and his wife is thinking to divorce. ‘Alcohol is the rubber tyres between me and the pier.’ He held up his glass to her. They chinked. ‘What gets you by,’ she said and took a sip. ‘You and me.’ ‘Me...
  13. Q

    fold into

    In Midwinter Break by B. McLavety, a couple want to a hotel. "Gerry was still on the bed with his shoes on when she came back into the room. She kicked off hers and folded herself into the coverlet beside him. From her bag she produced her Amsterdam guide and began to flick through it. One...
  14. Q

    [General] Hoping like mad for a bit

    In Midwinter Break by Bernard MacLaverty, a retired couple was going to Amsterdam. On airplane they recalled their young time: "Stella smiled and said, ‘We used to say the rosary in the car going to dances.’ ‘You did not.’ ‘The driver was a lot older than us but he was kind. Did it for petrol...
  15. Q

    brighter colours and warmer relations

    Hello everyone, I am reading Sweet tooth - McEwan Ian. 'The late sixties lightened but did not disrupt our existence. I never missed a day at my local grammar school unless I was ill. In my late teens there slipped over the garden wall some heavy petting, as they used to call it, experiments...
  16. Q

    faint eddy

    Hello Teachers, I encountered a sentence what I could not understand clearly in 'Of the farm' by John Updike: 'There she patted herself and panted in rapid faint eddies, like a resting dog.' to pant means to breathe with noisy deep gasp. In that case, what is meaning of rapid faint eddies...
  17. Q

    spare usefulness

    Hello all teachers and members, In Lost Ground (W. Trevor), there are some descriptions of a farm house. 'Nearly sixty years later, with a ragged front garden separating it from a lane that was used mainly by the Leesons, the house still stood white and slated, no tendrils of creeper softening...
  18. Q

    Fate smiled and destiny laughed as she came to my cradle

    Dear Teachers and members, In the some 'Wonder' by Natalie Merchant there is a sentence: 'Fate smiled and destiny laughed as she came to my cradle …' Please someone tell me the meaning of that? Fate and Destiny are two Gods? What is different between them. Thanks.
  19. Q

    settle to

    Hello everyone In After rain (W. Trevor) there is a sentence: 'The fourteenth of February in London was quite as black, and cold, and as wintersome as it was at Allington, and was, perhaps, somewhat more melancholy in its coldness. She has read that bit before and couldn’t settle to it, and...
  20. Q

    flaking in

    Hello teachers and members In After rain (W. Trevor) there is a sentence: In church 'Harriet walks slowly past flaring candles and the tomb of a local family, past the relics of the altar, and the story of Santa Fabiola flaking in a side chapel.' Please someone tell me what is meaning of...
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