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  1. S

    flick me a message

    If it's like Tinder, one has to swipe to connect with someone. Using "flick" to indicate a movement of the finger is not a far stretch, giving a command to the app on the phone. Like others said, it is not an idiom or a common expression, but it is completely understandable.
  2. S

    snicket (alley) (BrE)

    I have been in Chicago several times, but not outside the context of attending conventions. I only know "gangway!" as a cry for people to get out of the way cause you are coming through.
  3. S

    snicket (alley) (BrE)

    This is a totally new thing to me. Definitely seems like something that needs a word to describe it, but we lack one in AmE.
  4. S

    when must I use "of" to link two nouns

    When plural it becomes more problematic. I would stick to "energy of the nodes" because "node energy" is natural, but doesn't denote plurality, where "nodes' energy" when spoken is ambiguous.
  5. S

    2.25 kilos

    "Six and twenty-seven" is wrong. "Six and twenty-seven hundredths" is correct. That is what they are recommending in a math class. No one does this in real life, except for TV weatherpeople who may say we had "35 hundredths" of an inch of rain. "Six point two seven" is the normal and...
  6. S

    when must I use "of" to link two nouns

    Are you really referring to more than one sensor or node? I would use the longer phrase (temperature of the node) the first time, and then "node temperature" any subsequent times. No need for the possessive.
  7. S

    when must I use "of" to link two nouns

    In a simple example, like you first said, "water temperature" is preferred and natural. Your example about sensors, however, is much better and clearer when written "The activities and communications of the sensors..."
  8. S

    Was it too much to ask that...

    It's the subjunctive mood, found in places like this that express a desire. Also used for un-real situations, like "If I were king." You can use "is" in that sentence, but "be" is the correct word for the subjunctive mood of expression.
  9. S

    The Applicants has provided justification for objections.

    Should be "their" change of stance if plural.
  10. S

    These are the parents of the new generation, which, by simple inheritance, possesses

    These are. Noun. Verb. These are what? These are the parents. Which parents? The parents of the new generation. Tell us something about this new generation. This new generation possesses the qualities of toughness.
  11. S

    need answering / to be answered

    Yes, the line is that if Shakespeare were from western Pennsylvania, Hamlet would be famous for saying "Or not? That is the question."
  12. S

    need answering / to be answered

    In my peculiar dialect, we say "need answered," but I wouldn't recommend that to any learners.
  13. S

    Does a racing bike have "levers", "gears", "shifters".....

    Really? Americans change gears.
  14. S

    The Arch has encouraged some new building downtown.

    I assume this is about St Louis, which has a giant Arch as a landmark/attraction. Symbolizing the gateway through which many settlers of the American West crossed. St Louis at the time was the final stop in "civilization" before wagon trains headed out west. It's nothing to do with...
  15. S

    Does a racing bike have "levers", "gears", "shifters".....

    I am saying that in my experience, the word used is "shifter."
  16. S

    Does a racing bike have "levers", "gears", "shifters".....

    No. The shifter may be a lever, but it's not a "gear lever."
  17. S

    Nativity scene or Nativity crib?

    The usage is just "creche." Like "they had to put the creche on a private piece of land downtown because they aren't allowed to use the Courthouse property."
  18. S

    Nativity scene or Nativity crib?

    If you just said "crib" I would assume you were referring to a bed for an infant. Not a scene depicting the Nativity. "Nativity scene" or "creche" is what I would expect. Crib v creche may be an AmE/BrE difference?
  19. S

    alley / alleyway

    No. "Alley" is usually used. The only example of "alleyway" I can think of is in a song lyric. Makes it rhyme.
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