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  1. J

    I have a feeling about us. it's much older than you and me

    I have a feeling about us. it's much older than you and me. (without any context) What do these sentences mean? Does the second sentence mean "The feeling has been in my mind for a very long time"? / "I've felt this way for a very long time"?
  2. J

    He searched in his pockets for some change.

    Can the word 'in' be omitted without changing the meaning? If the answer is yes, which is better? He searched in his pockets for some change.
  3. J

    These books are suitable/suited for children aged 4 to 6.

    Are both adjectives all right in sentence 1 'These books are suitable/suited for children aged 4 to 6'? I know we can delete both words. I'd like to learn how to distinguish between suitable and suited. And how about this one: 2. Bob is suited/suitable for the job.
  4. J

    The weather could be raining and cold or hot and muggy.

    I came across the sentence on a FrazeIt webpage 'The weather could be raining and cold or hot and muggy' and I suspect it should be 'The weather could be rainy and cold or hot and muggy'. But I'm not sure. Should it be 'rainy' here?
  5. J

    welcome somebody to do something

    In the sentence below, the author uses the construction of 'welcome and encourage sb to do sth'. We cannot use 'welcome sb to do sth' independently, can we? As always, I welcome and encourage teachers and students to contact me with feedback, not only on their likes and dislikes but suggestions...
  6. J

    institutions of learning

    Do institutions of learning include elementary schools, high schools, colleges and universities? and anything else, for instance, research societies?
  7. J

    warrant a ministry all to themselves

    Do farmers still warrant a ministry all to themselves? I think they do. This sentence is taken from the Collins Cobuild Usage, without any context, in the entry of ELLEPSIS. What does the phrase 'a ministry' mean in this sentence, a government department or the profession or work of a church...
  8. J

    on/in his hands

    1 He has a lot of time on his hands. (Can we use 'in his hands'?) 2 He has a competitior on his hands. (What does the sentence mean? And can we use 'in his hands'?) 3 They have still got an economic crisis on their hands. (Can we use 'in their hands'?)
  9. J

    on the scene/spot

    An ambulance was on the scene/spot within minutes. The police were on the scene/spot within minutes. Do both prepositions work as well with these sentences, please?
  10. J

    late to/for class

    I was late to/for class yesterday. I was ten minutes late to/for my appointment. Are both prepositions OK with these sentences and do they work as well, please?
  11. J

    at hand/ on hand/ to hand

    There are always teachers at hand/ on hand/ to hand to give us help. There are always teachers near at hand/ near on hand/ near to hand to give us help. Are all three fine in these sentences, please?
  12. J

    that's what.

    What does 'that's what' mean in the following sentences? Does it mean 'That's the point' or 'That's what I want to say' or anything else? What had Professor Schmo ever done for him? Nothing, that 's what. --" What about them? " --" Just look at them, that 's what. Not a concern in the...
  13. J

    an injured soldier/ a wounded soldier

    I used to know only the phrase 'a wounded soldier' until I came across the phrase 'an injured soldier' in the COLLINS COBUILD DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH USAGE. Do both mean the same thing? In the entry of 'hurt' of this dictionary, there is also this example sentence: The soldier was badly hurt...
  14. J

    Can we use one/a instead of the?

    Can we use one/a instead of the? There was a television in the (one?) corner of the room. It is the (a?) custom for the bride's father to pay for the wedding.
  15. J

    What does 'a hot spoon' mean?

    What does 'a hot spoon' mean in the sentence below? Use a hot spoon to measure out honey into a bowl. (From CAMBRIDGE LEARNER'S DICTIONARY, 2001, measure)
  16. J

    It was obvious/apparent/clear that...

    It was obvious/apparent/clear that the child had been badly treated. It was obvious/apparent/clear from her face/ from what she said that she was upset. It was obvious/apparent/clear that I knew very little about it. Are all three adjectives fine in these three sentences? I would think they...
  17. J

    We welcome the government to build another school in this area.

    We welcome the government to build another school in this area. Is this sentence fine? I mean, can we use the construction of 'welcome sb to do sth', please?
  18. J

    He hurt/injured himself in a traffic accident

    We say 'He was hurt/was injured in a traffic accident', but can we say 'He hurt/injured himself in a traffic accident'? As the thank and like buttons don't work, could I thank you here in advance?
  19. J

    in my year at college

    He was in my year at college. He and I were in the same year at college. These two sentences show that he and I started college in the same year. Now if I was to name the particular year, for instance, 2006, how should I get the '2006' into the sentence, or rather, where should I put the '2006'...
  20. J

    student accountants

    Does 'student accountants' mean students who are training to become accountants and are doing some accounting work as part of their training, not students who are studying accounting in college or university? (Because the Thank and Like buttons don't work on my page, could I thank you in...
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