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  1. jutfrank

    all of your help

    The signature line of one of our regular members, which has been bugging me for a long time, reads like this: I appreciate all of your help. It's clear enough that the idea is to form a possessive of all of you but my mind finds it problematic to parse it that way. I can't help parsing all to...
  2. jutfrank

    Categorising names of years

    I started in 1998. I understand that in 1998 is a prepositional phrase, so I suppose that 1998 is a noun phrase. Could someone confirm that, please? Secondly, can 1998 be categorised as a noun even though it is not a word in the normal sense? If so, is it a proper noun? If not, what can it be...
  3. jutfrank

    Dialectic features

    I've started a new thread here to answer the request below from GoesStation, in the hope that others may similarly wish to describe some of the features they feel to be generic of their own dialect. Okay, I searched around quite a lot and the best I could come up with is this recording of two...
  4. jutfrank

    punctuating quoted language

    With the simple aim of hearing members' thoughts and practices on the issue, I'd like to discuss punctuating quoted language—an issue which crops up quite regularly on the forum, and on which members seem to have quite firm and occasionally conflicting positions. Here's a post by Piscean today...
  5. jutfrank

    Form and Function

    This is a continuation of the discussion started here. Originally Posted by Piscean The borders between word classes are sometimes fuzzy. By fuzzy, I read 'confused'. Most modern grammarians appear to feel that both form and function are vital elements in effective definition. That's...
  6. jutfrank

    Patterns with 'help'

    People frequently ask me how to use the word 'help'. So I thought I would post my answer here. Patterns using help to help somebody (to) do something ​Use this to express the purpose of the help: He's helped me (to) become a better man. to help somebody in something Use...
  7. jutfrank

    a couple who is arguing

    WordReference.com states: "Here in the States when "couple" refers to fiancées or to husband and wife, it takes the third person singular form in the present tense." I would like to ascertain whether there really do exist cultural preferences for this. I would like to ask native speakers of...
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