Search results

  1. V

    [General] a few collocations of "chime in"

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the verb in bold in the following sentences? David, as always, chimed in with the last word when he gave Grace and Diane the “Fashion Train Wreck of the Year” award. When...
  2. V

    [General] stall (v)

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the verb in bold in the following sentence? Then, every time, his left wing stalled on an upstroke, he'd roll violently left, stall his right wing recovering, and flick like...
  3. V

    [General] be in bad odour

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence? For years O’Hara had been in bad odour with the English constabulary on account of suspected activities against the...
  4. V

    [General] like old boots

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? I’ll stick to you like old boots. (M. Braddon, "Sir Jasper Tenant") They had walked twenty miles so that when we...
  5. V

    [General] a close call

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? Why, he mighty near starved…. So he learnt the trade, and then he was all right - but it was a close call. (M. Twain, “The...
  6. V

    [General] take something in stride

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? …she felt that she must have taken the Bursary – to use her father’s phrase – in her stride. (A. J. Cronin, “Halter’s...
  7. V

    [General] to take one’s word for it

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? “I shall love you for ever…” “I didn’t get that in black and white, but I’ll take your word for it.” (D. Cusack) I...
  8. V

    [General] to be at a loose end

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? Campion was a mining engineer, whom the Sultan on his way to England had met in Singapore and finding him at a loose end had...
  9. V

    [General] along of

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? ”I have never such luck, really,” exclaimed coquettish Miss Price after another hand or two. “It’s all along of you, Mr...
  10. V

    [General] to take something lying down

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? “I suppose you’re,” she muttered. “I know my father thinks so; but I should never have done it myself. I can’t take things...
  11. V

    [General] a few connotations of "notice"

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the usage of the mentioned below connotations of “notice”? We read the notice that the water would be turned off for two hours. notice = notification The landlady gave him notice to move...
  12. V

    [General] to turn on somebody

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? He never felt like a foreigner in Spanish and they did not really treat him like a foreigner most of the time. They turned on...
  13. V

    [General] to let bygones be bygones

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? “You never liked Harry, did you?” he said softly. “After the way he behaved to you.-“Simeon cackled. He said: “Al, but...
  14. V

    [General] to have a way with one

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? Oh, yes. I know he’s thrilling and exciting and marvelous to look at, and has a way with him that would charm a duck off a...
  15. V

    [General] to let one (friend) down/ to leave somebody in the lurch

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences? She let me down. “I was almost afraid…”she broke off, but I finished the sentence for her: “That I would let you...
  16. V

    [General] fishmonger/ ironmonger/ warmonger

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion about the following sentence I have read recently? A fishmonger is the man who mongs fish; the ironmonger and warmonger do the same with iron and war; they just mong them. (George Mikes, “How to be an Alien”)...
  17. V

    [General] hit the grit

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to help to me to make the proper choice of an interpretation of the term in bold in the following sentence? It was a case of “pay or hit the grit” … Those who did not pay were left behind, unless they were skilful enough to ride the train in...
  18. V

    [General] sit on the lid

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence? I’ve kept it out of the newspapers so far. I can’t sit on the lid much longer. We’re too well known socially and otherwise...
  19. V

    [General] grit

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to help to me to make the proper choice of an interpretation of the term in bold in the following sentence? They had enough grit to hold out in the face of real hardship. grit = stamina, courage, steadfastness, perseverance, bravery...
  20. V

    [General] tug of war

    Dear teachers, Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences? But it was when the ladies were alone that Becky knew the tug of war would come. (W. Thackeray, “Vanity Fir”) Barbara...
Top