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    • Join Date: Aug 2005
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    #1

    A new star has been born

    Hello everyone!

    A friend of mine just gave birth to a baby and I wrote 'A new star has been born' in a card. But now that I've sent the card, I come to wonder if this line is normal and acceptable as a part of my warm wishes to this friend. So, my questions are:

    What is the difference between (1) a new star has been born and (2) a new star is born?

    For this card I wrote, which line is more suitable?

    Thanks, Morning

  1. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A new star has been born

    Quote Originally Posted by morning View Post
    Hello everyone!

    A friend of mine just gave birth to a baby and I wrote 'A new star has been born' in a card. But now that I've sent the card, I come to wonder if this line is normal and acceptable as a part of my warm wishes to this friend. So, my questions are:

    What is the difference between (1) a new star has been born and (2) a new star is born?

    For this card I wrote, which line is more suitable?

    Thanks, Morning
    To me, a new star is born sounds stronger.


    • Join Date: Aug 2005
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    #3

    Re: A new star has been born

    Thanks Engee30 for your reply. But in that case, can I say that both sentences are okay and correct, just that 'A new star has been born' is less common to be used in a greeting card?

  2. engee30's Avatar
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    #4

    Smile Re: A new star has been born

    Quote Originally Posted by morning View Post
    Thanks Engee30 for your reply. But in that case, can I say that both sentences are okay and correct, just that 'A new star has been born' is less common to be used in a greeting card?
    That's exactly what I think.
    With is born, the phrase being expressed in the so-called historic present, the whole sentence reads to me like a headline in a newspaper, which normally gives us the most important information.
    So, yes, has been born seems less common to be used on a greeting card in my humble opinion. Other members' opinion on this might differ, of course.

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    #5

    Re: A new star has been born

    'A new star is born' is a fairly standard phrase and is the form more likely to be found in cards, but I agree that both are correct.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A new star has been born

    Quote Originally Posted by morning View Post
    Hello everyone!

    A friend of mine just gave birth to a baby and I wrote 'A new star has been born' in a card. But now that I've sent the card, I come to wonder if this line is normal and acceptable as a part of my warm wishes to this friend. So, my questions are:

    What is the difference between (1) a new star has been born and (2) a new star is born?

    For this card I wrote, which line is more suitable?

    Thanks, Morning
    In the context you've used it, they mean the same thing. I'm sure your friend will not be concerned about the exact wording.

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    #7

    Re: A new star has been born

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    In the context you've used it, they mean the same thing. I'm sure your friend will not be concerned about the exact wording.
    Good point- griping about the verb form would be some heavy duty grammar policing.

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