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    #1

    Sentence

    What are you up to listening outside doors?

    What did you do that?

    Since the first sentence is right, Why is not right the second? Please.

  1. mara_ce's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Sentence

    What did you do that?
    I think that "what and that" are redundant. They have the same function: direct object.
    You did what (something).
    You did that (something).
    That´s why the question is wrong.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    What are you up to listening outside doors?

    What did you do that?

    Since the first sentence is right, Why is not right the second? Please.
    Your question is not really logical. The only similarity between these sentences is they start with "what", and they are about 'you' doing something.
    What is the intended meaning of you second example?

    By the way:
    What did you do that for? and Why did you do that? mean exactly the same thing - For what reason did you do that?
    But What did you that? means nothing.

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    #4

    Re: Sentence

    What are you up to listening outside doors?

    Why are you up to listening outside doors?

    Do they mean the same? Please.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    What are you up to listening outside doors?

    Why are you up to listening outside doors?

    Do they mean the same? Please.
    No. 'to be up to something' is an idiom. It's used to mean something suspicious or dubious.

    What are you up to listening outside doors? = What are you doing listening outside doors?
    Why are you listening outside doors?

    You can also use "to be up to" like this:
    A: Hi, how's things?
    B: Not bad. What have you been up to?
    (What have you been doing since we met last?)
    A: Oh, nothing much.

    Note: you only use this with friends. It's used jokingly, in the sense that you're asking your friend if he's been misbehaving. But it also means just "What have you been doing". It depends on how you say it.

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    #6

    Re: Sentence

    Thank you.

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