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    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 17
    #1

    Question Any difference?

    hello,

    I'm a little bit confused about something below,

    The decision what he has offered is positive.(is it a noun clause or appositive noun clause?) ; and also,
    The decision about his offer is possitive.(is it a relative clause or a noun clause?)

    Could you please give me some explanation?''WHY''

    Thanks.

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Any difference?

    Hello soguksu


    [1] The decision what he has offered is positive.

    • Do you mean, that he has offered.
    • If not, then I'd parse it as (that) what he has offered, a relative clause.
    [2] The decision about his offer is positive.

    • relative clauses begin with a relative pronoun. The phrase about his offer begins with a preposition.
    • noun clauses have a subject and a verb. The phrase about his offer doesn't have a subject or a verb.


    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 17
    #3

    Re: Any difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hello soguksu


    [1] The decision what he has offered is positive.

    • Do you mean, that he has offered.
    • If not, then I'd parse it as (that) what he has offered, a relative clause.
    [2] The decision about his offer is positive.

    • relative clauses begin with a relative pronoun. The phrase about his offer begins with a preposition.
    • noun clauses have a subject and a verb. The phrase about his offer doesn't have a subject or a verb.
    First, thank you for your answer,

    I mean;If I used a clause after a noun , would the clause be a noun clause or an appositive noun clause?
    - He has offered us to go to Paris, and then ;
    The decision That He has offered us to go to Paris is positive.In this sentence I did not use this sentence as an appositive n. cl. ; I used it as a noun clause, Because the decision has been made on it.

    And like this one;

    -She is guilty, Because there is some evidence about this/that she is guilty.

    Is it correct in the meaning and grammar?

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