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  1. terrenziqq's Avatar
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      • Taiwan
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    #1

    Smile Two questions about teeth and temperature

    Hello, I have two questions about daily conversation.
    The first is how to describe one’s teeth look beautiful or ugly, especially when I want to describe one’s teeth are in good order or messy.
    The second is in Mandarin, if people want to express they don’t like hot weather because they are likely to sweat a lot on hot days, we often say “I’m afraid of hotness.” (It’s common to say in this way in Mandarin.) However, the sentence is a direct translation from Mandarin into English. I know it can’t be said this way in English speaking countries. A similar situation is when someone titillates another’s armpit , the one being titillated may have two reactions. One is “I’m not afraid of itchiness” or he/she may burst out laughing, dodge, and say “Stop it! I’m afraid of itchiness.” When it comes to eating spicy food, people may have two ways of expressing if they dare eat spicy food or not like the above situations.
    So, could anybody help me? Thanks a lot.

  2. I'm With Stupid's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Two questions about teeth and temperature

    For teeth, the most common would be "nice teeth" or "bad teeth."

    For hot weather, I would simply say "I don't like the heat" or "I don't like hot weather." Another word for conditions which are uncomfortably hot and humid would be "stuffy." So you could say, "the weather is stuffy today," or "it's stuffy in here" if you're in a hot building, and that would be a way of saying that it's hot in a negative manner.

    For the armpit question, I assume by titillate, you mean "tickle." Titillate can mean a similar thing, but its more common meaning would be to excite sexually. In response to being tickled, you would say "that tickles." You can also be ticklish, which means you're sensitive to being tickled in a particular area. So you can say "I'm ticklish," or "my feet are ticklish," for example. Itchiness is a different thing altogether. An itch is something that happens by itself, whereas tickling is something that is done to you by another person or thing.

    And finally spicy food. "I like spicy food" or "I don't like spicy food" are fine. You can also substitute the word "spicy" for "hot."

    Hope that helps.

    Not a teacher.

  3. terrenziqq's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 64
    #3

    Smile Re: Two questions about teeth and temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by I'm With Stupid View Post
    For teeth, the most common would be "nice teeth" or "bad teeth."

    For hot weather, I would simply say "I don't like the heat" or "I don't like hot weather." Another word for conditions which are uncomfortably hot and humid would be "stuffy." So you could say, "the weather is stuffy today," or "it's stuffy in here" if you're in a hot building, and that would be a way of saying that it's hot in a negative manner.

    For the armpit question, I assume by titillate, you mean "tickle." Titillate can mean a similar thing, but its more common meaning would be to excite sexually. In response to being tickled, you would say "that tickles." You can also be ticklish, which means you're sensitive to being tickled in a particular area. So you can say "I'm ticklish," or "my feet are ticklish," for example. Itchiness is a different thing altogether. An itch is something that happens by itself, whereas tickling is something that is done to you by another person or thing.

    And finally spicy food. "I like spicy food" or "I don't like spicy food" are fine. You can also substitute the word "spicy" for "hot."

    Hope that helps.

    Not a teacher.
    Thanks a lot! It really helps.
    Ha ha... I didn't know "titillate" means that way because the Mandarin explanation of it in a dictionary looks normal.
    Mmm... Ticklish... I learn a good word. Thank you for all the useful information.

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