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  1. #1

    Loose or Lose

    I think I already know the answer to this, but I am seeing it so often -many times in credible sources - that I am beginning to question myself.

    If I say, I know the Mets are going to loose the game, I am wrong, right?

    Or this one - she turned to the right and left, but the deer in the road caused her to loose control.

    In both of these, they should only have one O, right?

    Thanks for anyone who assists.

  2. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Smile Re: Loose or Lose

    Quote Originally Posted by paul4567 View Post
    I think I already know the answer to this, but I am seeing it so often -many times in credible sources - that I am beginning to question myself.

    If I say, I know the Mets are going to loose the game, I am wrong, right?

    Or this one - she turned to the right and left, but the deer in the road caused her to loose control.

    In both of these, they should only have one O, right? You're absolutely right.

    Thanks for anyone who assists.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Loose or Lose

    Quote Originally Posted by paul4567 View Post
    I think I already know the answer to this, but I am seeing it so often -many times in credible sources - that I am beginning to question myself.

    If I say, I know the Mets are going to loose the game, I am wrong, right?

    Or this one - she turned to the right and left, but the deer in the road caused her to loose control.

    In both of these, they should only have one O, right?

    Thanks for anyone who assists.
    As engee30 has said, you are right, 'loose' is an adjective, the opposite of 'tight'. 'Lose' is a verb, the opposite of 'win'.

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Loose or Lose

    I think it's usually a typO.


  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Loose or Lose

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    I think it's usually a typO.

    That's seeing it in a very positive light.

  6. RonBee's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Loose or Lose

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    That's seeing it in a very positive light.
    Well, it is true that some people just can't spell.

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