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    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 49
    #1

    who, an idiom

    hi, which one is correct:

    peter Hanson is a famous artist. He came to London in 1997.

    1. peter Hanson who is a famous artist came to London in 1997.
    2. peter Hanson who came to London in 1997 is a famous artist

    moreover is the following sentence correct:
    I should have called my friend, and told her happy birthday.

    is the meaning of this idiom as following:
    do not look a gift horse in the mouth.
    (don't say to person who buy you a gift what is this)

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • England
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: who, an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by am-ta View Post
    hi, which one is correct:

    Peter Hanson is a famous artist. He came to London in 1997.

    1. Peter Hanson, who is a famous artist, came to London in 1997.
    2. Peter Hanson, who came to London in 1997, is a famous artist.

    Moreover is the following sentence correct:
    I should have called my friend, and wishedher happy birthday.

    Is the meaning of this idiom as follows:
    Do not look a gift horse in the mouth.
    (Don't say to person who buys you a gift. What is this?)
    Bhai.


    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 49
    #3

    Re: who, an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Bhai.
    hi, can we say:
    David Copperfield was a wizard?
    I can't enter this street or to this street?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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      • Australia
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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #4

    Re: who, an idiom

    Quote Originally Posted by am-ta View Post
    hi, can we say:
    David Copperfield was a wizard?
    I can't enter this street or to this street?
    No, David Copperfield is a stage magician. There are arguably no wizards in existence. A "wizard" is a person who performs real magic - like turning princes into frogs. Wizards only exist if real magic exists. It's a word best kept for Hollywood films.

    I can't enter this street.

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