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  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 5
    #1

    have some questions...

    Hi,

    Is there any one who can help to answer my several questions? Thanks!!

    What is the different between following sentences?

    question 1:
    1) I still haven't finished my work.
    2) I have still not finished my work.

    question 2:
    1) Generally I don't read a news paper.
    2) I don't read a news paper generally.

    Regards,
    Tai

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,104
    #2

    Re: have some questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by htu6998 View Post
    What is the different between following sentences?

    question 1:
    1) I still haven't finished my work.
    2) I have still not finished my work.
    There's no difference in meaning. You can choose which you want to use.

    question 2:
    1) Generally I don't read a newspaper.
    2) I don't read a newspaper generally.
    There's no difference in meaning. This would normally be expressed as:
    I generally don't read newspapers, or I generally don't read the newspaper.

    R.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Smile Re: have some questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by htu6998 View Post
    Hi,

    Is there any one who can help to answer my several questions? Thanks!!

    What is the different between following sentences?

    question 1:
    1) I still haven't finished my work.
    2) I have still not finished my work.

    question 2:
    1) Generally I don't read a news paper.
    2) I don't read a news paper generally.

    Regards,
    Tai
    1) I still haven't finished my work.
    2) I have still not finished my work.

    These two sentences mean the same thing. However, I would say that "still" after the auxiliary "have" occurs with much less frequency than "still" after "I", the subject. Nevertheless, it's correct and one would hear of read it.

    question 2:
    1) Generally I don't read a news paper.
    2) I don't read a news paper generally.

    They mean the same thing. We would more typically use "the: definite article" in the case of "newspaper", however. Using "a" makes it sound like the person speaking could choose from any number of newspapers every day. Typically, we think of one, or maybe two, newspapers that we might read daily. So when someone says "newspaper", we would more frequently say "the newspaper", which we would generally understand to be one or two that the speaker would likely read if he or she reads the newspaper. By contrast, a head of state, or a world leader, might possibly say "I try to read a newspaper (at least one) every day". This is so because a world leader might choose from any number of newspapers to read each day, as he or she would want to be aware of what's going on in many, or all parts, of the world.

    Article use can be tricky in English. If you have any questions about articles or this explanation, I'll gladly answer them.
    Last edited by PROESL; 22-Jul-2009 at 13:52. Reason: extra words

  3. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 5
    #4

    Re: have some questions...

    Thank you all for your quickly reply!

    By the way, though they both have the same meaning, are they all grammar correct? Can I write them both when I am taking some formal english tests? ?

    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #5

    Smile Re: have some questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by htu6998 View Post
    Thank you all for your quickly reply!

    By the way, though they both have the same meaning, are they all grammar correct? Can I write them both when I am taking some formal english tests? ?

    Thanks.
    1) I still haven't finished my work.
    2) I have still not finished my work.

    I believe you are talking about these two sentences (listed directly above). If you are, then, yes, they are both grammatically correct. I've noticed that some people tend to be very sensitive about adverb placement when speaking of what they believe is correct. Also, I don't typically teach English for tests. However, I would make a case of it with any teacher that told me either of these sentences is wrong. They're both correct. If there is any difference in meaning, then it would have to do with emphasis.

    (make a case of it = present an argument)



  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,627
    #6

    Re: have some questions...

    Quote Originally Posted by htu6998 View Post
    Thank you all for your quickly reply!

    By the way, though they both have the same meaning, are they all grammar correct? Can I write them both when I am taking some formal english tests? ?

    Thanks.
    For an English test, I would recommend that you use sentence 1/.

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