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    #1

    Englishman

    What are the main differences, regarding use, among the adjectives English, Englisman, Englishwoman, French, Frenchman, Frenchwoman, Irish, Irishman, Irishwoman and similars.

    For instance,
    "He is English." and "He is an Englishman" mean exactly the same?
    Is there any preference usage ?

    Such adjective come in a limited number, right? I mean, you cannot say
    Americanman, Argentinianman, Brazilianman or Italianman, can you?

    By the way, one last point, should such adjectives come always with the first letter capitalized ?
    Last edited by Abstract Idea; 30-Jul-2009 at 19:26.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Englishman

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    What are the main differences, regarding use, among the adjectives English, Englisman, Englishwoman, French, Frenchman, Frenchwoman, Irish, Irishman, Irishwoman and similars.

    For instance,
    "He is English." and "He is an Englishman" mean exactly the same?
    Is there any preference usage ?

    Such adjective come in a limited number, right? I mean, you cannot say
    Americanman, Argentinianman, Brazilianman or Italianman, can you?

    By the way, one last point, should such adjectives come always with the first letter capitalized ?
    There's no difference really between "He's English" and "He's an Englishman". The second could be said to be tautology given that you've already said "he is", so you don't need to specify that it's a man.

    There certainly seem to be a limited number of nationalities that this can be used for. I would say that the most common are Englishman, Englishwoman, Scotsman / Scotswoman (though in the full sentence you would say "He is Scottish" not "He is Scots"), Welshman, Irishman.

    Other than the 4 countries that make up the UK, I think the only country I've heard it attached to is France. "He's a Frenchman."

    Yes, the first letter would ALWAYS be capitalised because it refers to nationality.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 30-Jul-2009 at 21:45. Reason: Spelling correction!


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    #3

    Re: Englishman

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Such adjective come in a limited number, right? I mean, you cannot say
    Americanman, Argentinianman, Brazilianman or Italianman, can you? You can, but the two words are kept separate: Brazilian man.

    By the way, one last point, should such adjectives come always with the first letter capitalized ? Yes.

    ..

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