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    #1

    What`s the difference between these pairs of words?

    Dear teachers,
    Good day! Could you tell me what the difference between these pairs of words is.

    Here are the words:
    1)dismissal/lay-off
    2)income/revenue
    3)slogan/motto
    4)clergyman/parson/priest
    5)vogue/fashion.

    Thanks in advance,
    Max.

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    #2

    Re: What`s the difference between these pairs of words?

    Hello,

    "lay-off" is used to talk about when companies have to let go of employees, usually due to economic issues. You don't hear the word "dismissal" used a lot in terms of people losing their jobs.

    "revenue" is the total amount of money a company takes in for a certain time period. "income" is what money a company keeps after subtracting expenses. If you are talking about an individual person you would use income to talk about the money that person makes a year. You don't use revenue very often when talking about an individual.

    "slogan" and "motto" are very similar. They both are small sentences or groups of words that express what the group or party feels is important or expresses their goal. When talking about an individual you would use "motto" more often. "His motto is "eat right and work hard."

    I don't know if I could give you good answers on the next two. A priest is a specific position in the Catholic church, and a clergyman is a broader term. It can mean anyone in the clergy.

    I hope this helped a bit!



    Hello,

    You can use "as well" to replace "too" or "also". I would say that English speakers use "as well" less often. Some people may disagree with me, but here in the US I think you are more likely to hear "also" or "too". Here is an example of a sentence using all three. They all sound good:

    I need to go to the store, but I need to go to the cleaners as well.

    I need to go to the store, but I need to go to the cleaners also.

    I need to go to the store, but I need to go to the cleaners too.

    I hope this helps!


    Andrew Lawton

    Last edited by Anglika; 02-Aug-2009 at 00:33. Reason: removal of unauthorised link

    • Member Info
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      • Russian
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    #3

    Re: What`s the difference between these pairs of words?

    Thanks a lot! Your explanations are quite clear!

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