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    #1

    So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    1 sounds natural to my ear, but how about 2? People would say, "He can speak French, and so can Jason," but how would you say somebody can do something too when the object of the verb is different?

    [1] He can't speak French, and neither can he speak German.
    [2] He can speak French, and so can he speak German.

    Hiro

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    #2

    Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    1 sounds natural to my ear, but how about 2? People would say, "He can speak French, and so can Jason," but how would you say somebody can do something too when the object of the verb is different?

    [1] He can't speak French, and neither can he speak German.
    [2] He can speak French, and so can he speak German.

    Hiro
    I think, using "and" you can keep the subject the same.
    He can speak French, and so can speakGerman.


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    #3

    Smile Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    1 sounds natural to my ear, but how about 2? People would say, "He can speak French, and so can Jason," but how would you say somebody can do something too when the object of the verb is different?

    [1] He can't speak French, and neither can he speak German.
    [2] He can speak French, and so can he speak German.

    Hiro
    Yes, I understand what you mean about the example sentences you posted. That's a good point, and an interesting one.

    I would use one of these sentences.
    1. He can speak both French and German.
    2. He can speak French, as well as German.
    3. He can speak French and German.

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    #4

    Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    One more query about this 'so' construct ....

    A: I intentionally ignored his remark.
    B: So did I. (This means the second person also 'intentionally' ignored his remark)

    A: I hardly ignored his remark.
    B: So did I. (This means the second person also ignored his remark. So this reply would sound very odd)

    With 'hardly' --- and adverbs such as 'scarcely,' 'seldom,' and 'barely' ---, the sense of the adverb is not included in the interpretation, isn't it?

    Hiro/ Sendai, Japan


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    #5

    Smile Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    One more query about this 'so' construct ....

    A: I intentionally ignored his remark.
    B: So did I. (This means the second person also 'intentionally' ignored his remark)

    A: I hardly ignored his remark.
    B: So did I. (This means the second person also ignored his remark. So this reply would sound very odd)

    With 'hardly' --- and adverbs such as 'scarcely,' 'seldom,' and 'barely' ---, the sense of the adverb is not included in the interpretation, isn't it?

    Hiro/ Sendai, Japan
    The second pair of dialog sentences would sound odd, yes.

    By saying "I hardly ignored his remark", the speaker means to say "I did not ignore his remark".

    I'm not exactly sure of what you are asking, however. Could you rephrase your question, please?

    Last edited by PROESL; 04-Aug-2009 at 01:06.

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    #6

    Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    I wanted to know if the interpretatio of the 'so reply' would include the sense of 'hardly,' 'scarcely,' 'seldom,' and 'barely.

    For instance ...
    'I seldom went to Christmas parties.'
    'So do I' (Wrong way of saying 'I seldom do, either,' as this so-reply does not include the sense of 'seldom,' right?)

    I didn't mention 'rarely,' but it's in the same group in this respect, isn't it?

    Hiro


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    #7

    Smile Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    I wanted to know if the interpretatio of the 'so reply' would include the sense of 'hardly,' 'scarcely,' 'seldom,' and 'barely.

    For instance ...
    'I seldom went to Christmas parties.'
    'So do I' (Wrong way of saying 'I seldom do, either,' as this so-reply does not include the sense of 'seldom,' right?)

    I didn't mention 'rarely,' but it's in the same group in this respect, isn't it?

    Hiro
    I see. I understand now. The answer to your question is no.

    In response to "I seldom went to Christmas parties" in order to indicate the same, one would have to say, "neither did I".



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    #8

    Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post

    I didn't mention 'rarely,' but it's in the same group in this respect, isn't it?

    Hiro
    Yes, "rarely" is in the same group, but I feel that "hardly ever" and "seldom" are more commonly used than "rarely", at least in American English and in my opinion.

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    #9

    Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    I think, using "and" you can keep the subject the same.
    He can speak French, and so can speakGerman.
    I'm not sure whether you're saying the sentence in red is correct. It's not, unless you mean: "He can speak French, and therefore he can speak German." This is grammatical, but not logical.

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    #10

    Re: So + Auxiliary Verb + Subject ....

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    In response to "I seldom went to Christmas parties" in order to indicate the same, one would have to say, "neither did I".

    How about a response to "I could barely afford to buy this house" to indicate the same? Would it be "Neither could I" or "So could I," or yet anything else?

    Many thanks!

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