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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Post Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    thanks first.

    here are the questions.

    Example:
    The foolish clown tries to sing.

    Q:
    the infinitive above should be considered as complement or object ?
    sometimes it is very hard to differentiate complement and object.


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    #2

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    I would bet it is an object. However I must say I am not an expert. In fact I have just been introduced to such object/complement by your post.
    I have found something interesting here: ENGLISH PAGE - Gerunds and Infinitives Part 1

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    #3

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    Hello kl004535

    In your example below, the infinitive to sing follows the verb tries, not a direct object:


    • The foolish clown tries to sing.


    Note that, an object complement is an noun, pronoun, or adjective which follows a direct object and renames it or tells what the direct object has become. It is most often used with verbs of creating or nominating such as make, name, elect, paint, call, etc. Source

    See Infinitives

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    #4

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hello kl004535

    In your example below, the infinitive to sing follows the verb tries, not a direct object:


    • The foolish clown tries to sing.


    Note that, an object complement is an noun, pronoun, or adjective which follows a direct object and renames it or tells what the direct object has become. It is most often used with verbs of creating or nominating such as make, name, elect, paint, call, etc. Source

    See Infinitives

    You mean to sing here is neither an object nor a complement?
    In the page I mentioned above they give the following examples:

    • The most important thing is to learn. complement of sentence
    • He wants to learn. object of sentence

    Do you agree with their classification Soup?


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    #5

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    • The most important thing is to learn. complement of sentence
    • He wants to learn. object of sentence
    I am not Soup, but then it is a public forum.

    In the first sentence, the infinitive clause is a predicate nominative.
    In the second, he wants what? To learn. Yes. It is the object of the verb and not an objective complement. I have no idea why I said so in the first place.

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    #6

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    You mean to sing here is neither an object nor a complement?
    In the page I mentioned above they give the following examples:

    • The most important thing is to learn. complement of sentence
    • He wants to learn. object of sentence

    Do you agree with their classification Soup?
    Yes, and no.

    Terminology: in the first example, to learn functions as a subject complement. In the second example, it functions as the object of the verb wants.

  4. Junior Member
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    #7

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    The foolish clown tries to sing.

    so to sing here should be considered as Subjective complement or direct object ? pls help


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    #8

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post
    The foolish clown tries to sing.

    so to sing here should be considered as Subjective complement or direct object ? pls help
    No! The presence of a subject complement presupposes the presence of a copula.
    Or did you mean objective complement. Both are missing in the sentence.

    'try' is a transitive verb, which means it takes an object. That object is called the object of the verb. Mind, 'to sing' is not a direct object, still less an indirect object. It is the object of the transitive verb, tries.

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    #9

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    thanks...

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    #10

    Re: Analysis of the use of the infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by kl004535 View Post

    Q:
    the infinitive above should be considered as complement or object ?
    sometimes it is very hard to differentiate complement and object.

    It is best to bear in mind that the two belong to different types of analysis. "Object" belongs to analysis in terms of Grammatical Relations (also known as Grammatical Functions), along with Subject, Predicate etc. "Complement" has various uses, but one of the most common refers to a structural position in the sentence, in which it is said to be "governed" by the verb. Very often, therefore, "Object" and "Complement" are two different ways of referring to the same thing.

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