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  1. Copy-editor's Avatar
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    #1

    Who would hyphen here?

    Hello,

    Would you agree or disagree that there should be a hyphen between Spanish and speaking in the following sentence?

    'I speak in Spanglish so that we cover both the Spanish-speaking and English-speaking audiences in the US.'

    Any thoughts?


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #2

    Re: Who would hyphen here?

    I'm no copy editor, but I would. Compound adjectives consisting of a noun plus a participle are usually hyphenated before a noun, although they may be left open if no noun follows. Here, I'd hyphenate both.

    Greg


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #3

    Smile Re: Who would hyphen here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Copy-editor View Post
    Hello,

    Would you agree or disagree that there should be a hyphen between Spanish and speaking in the following sentence?

    'I speak in Spanglish so that we cover both the Spanish-speaking and English-speaking audiences in the US.'

    Any thoughts?
    It makes sense to hyphenate there, yes. However, I'm not exactly enthusiastic about such hybrids as "Spanglish" and "Portuņol".

    Both combinations form a compound as they are used. Many writers would probably overlook this point. But I would go with the hyphen. It's a good idea.



    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #4

    Smile Re: Who would hyphen here?

    Quote Originally Posted by dragn View Post
    I'm no copy editor, but I would. Compound adjectives consisting of a noun plus a participle are usually hyphenated before a noun, although they may be left open if no noun follows. Here, I'd hyphenate both.

    Greg
    If a noun doesn't follow, then it could be that the compound is a predicate adjective. For example, "I've heard that some parts of Brazil that border Argentina are both Portuguese-speaking and Spanish-speaking. Then again, maybe it's not exactly so: Portuņol or Portunhol.



    [So those parts would be speaking parts, or one could say parts that speak.]
    Last edited by PROESL; 06-Aug-2009 at 12:39. Reason: left out "be" after "could" typo

  2. Copy-editor's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Who would hyphen here?

    Thanks to all for responding. I like the hyphen too.

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